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Adam Reborn: A Family Guide to Surviving a Traumatic Brain Injury

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12
Dec

Dear Friends - If Giving a Bike/Skateboard This Holiday Season - Please Don't Forget to Include a Helmet.

Posted by on in TBI

shark-helmet

Dear Friends,

There are are over 1.7 million head injuires a year, just in the United States alone - every year. Please protect and love your "little ones" this Holiday Season, by including a helmet with any bike/skateboard purchase.

Helmets can make a difference by protecting your loved one.

Have a Wonderful Holiday Season!

From Adam, Alex and Jill

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Hits: 1453
09
Dec

This Busy Holiday Season Give "Yourself" a Healthy Gift - Sleep!!!

Posted by on in TBI

SleeplessInAmerica

We all know what it's like to get a lousy or short night of sleep: Tempers shorten, snacks become more tempting, attention gets harder to sustain.

Researchers are just beginning to understand the long-term consequences of a lifetime of those rough mornings — and it doesn't look good.

Poor sleep has been linked to heart disease, diabetes, obesity and depression. Newer research has drawn connections between bad sleep and Alzheimer's. A study released last year showed that the better 700 participants slept, the less likely they were to develop Alzheimer's over the next 3.5 years.

A growing body of research suggests that during sleep, the brain appears to flush out harmful chemicals such as the beta amyloid that builds up in Alzheimer's.

"The brain requires a kind of cleanup process that we're beginning to glimpse," Collins said. "Without taking out the trash, you're going to find that the next day, your brain is not functioning at its best."

(USAtoday.com)

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20
Nov

Adam was Recently Invited as a Guest Speaker for CSUN's Speech Language Pathology Program Regarding TBI Recovery

Posted by on in TBI

Adam was honored to meet students/members of CSUN's (California State University of Northridge) Speech Language Pathology Program - Giving Insight to Therapists Regarding His Recovery from a TBI.

IMG 0391b

(Adam and Sarah Cathcart/ SLP/ CSUN Faculty Member at recent CSUN Speech Pathology Seminar)

Adam provided inspiration and insight to potential Speech Pathologists at the invitation from Sarah who was one of his Speech Therapists that aided him in his recovery!

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03
Nov

Hacking Your Brain vs TBI Recovery (Science Wants To Control Your Brain) - Dear friends, I believe our minds are our own!

Posted by on in TBI

                    20877

 

The technology sounds simultaneously fake and dangerous: Strap on a headset and send targeted electrical currents into your brain for about 15 minutes to get more energy, improve your focus or calm down.

Now Silicon Valley is hoping it can turn brain stimulation tech into sleek wearable devices for consumers. Is it really possible to make the jump from the lab to Best Buy shelves?

The latest company to attempt to create a consumer brain stimulation product is Thync, a start-up with a serious pedigree. Founded by entrepreneur Isy Goldwasser and neuroscientist Jamie Tyler, who has a PhD in psychology and behavioral neuroscience, Thync has been working on its device secretly for the past three years. It's a portable headset that will offer three settings to start: energy, relaxation and focus.

"For some people it would be their third cup of coffee, for some people it would be their afternoon nap," said Goldwasser.

One of the primary technologies Thync is based on is transcranial direct current stimulation, or tDCS, which uses a weak electrical current to change the sensitivity of neurons in the brain. Neurons are cells in the brain that send electrical signals to each other, resulting in the release of chemicals that impact what a person is thinking or feeling. When targeted to the right area, the tDCS currents can create changes in how a person's brain is functioning.

With the potential to replace everything including a soda habit, yoga class or pharmaceuticals for mental disorders, the market for brain stimulation devices that are proven to work is potentially huge. The U.S. military has even experimented with it as a way to improve pilot training. Thync is focusing on small improvements for already healthy minds.

"The users are going to be people who really have busy lives and really need tools besides chemicals, drugs or alcohol," said Goldwasser. "They'd like another approach to change their mental state."

Thync has already tested its product on more than 2,000 people in as many trials. After using Thync, the subjects answer questions about how they feel and the researchers measure their vitals. If it wants FDA approval down the line, Thync will need to go through extensive clinical trials. Thync plans on having its first product ready by 2015. The California-based company recently secured $13 million in venture capital funding.

It's still too early to know how effective Thync or other future brain stimulation devices will be when they are released. But supporters of the technology think we're just at the beginning of a consumer neurotechnology revolution. Tyler thinks soon these products will be commonplace:

"It is inevitable."

(CNN.health.com)

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21
Oct

TBI Recovery, Means Therapy. (Don't Give Up!)

Posted by on in TBI

"With TBI, therapy is the most clear way to recovery.  Every little bit of therapy really does count.  I know!"   - Adam

 

Happy-People 

 

Therapy for a brain injury will normally begin at the hospital, then continue at a rehabilitation facility.

Physical therapy for brain injured patients includes treatments that help improve coordination, walking, reducing pain and restoring function for everyday tasks.

Occupational therapy for brain recovery provides assistance in regaining daily living tasks such as eating, dressing, bathing and writing.Read more :  http://www.ehow.com/way_5588970_brain-recovery-therapy.html

Occupational therapy for brain recovery provides assistance in regaining daily living tasks such as eating, dressing, bathing and writing. Also, speech and recreational therapy can be vital to recovery. Even music therapy has been proven to soothe and improve TBI recovery.

Many brain recovery patients suffer from depression as their inability to function the way they used to leads to frustration and sadness. Sessions with a psychiatrist or psychologist and the use of anti-depressants such as Prozac may help the patient improve their moods which will also help with their rehabilitation efforts.

Depending on the amount of damage and where the damage is located in the brain will determine the extent of recovery. Mild damage to the brain may be able to heal completely. Recovery for extensive damage may mean only partial recovery. Each individual is different and recovery depends on your doctor's recommendations.

(eHow.com)

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08
Oct

Dear Friends, Would You Let Your Son Play Football? (3 HS Football Players Die In A Week!)

Posted by on in TBI

                high school football

A varsity football player from suburban New York high school died after colliding with an opponent during a game, a school official said.

Tom Cutinella, a 16-year-old student at Shoreham-Wading River High School, suffered a serious head injury during Wednesday night's game against Elwood-John H. Glenn High School, according to Suffolk County Police spokeswoman Joan Jesinger.

He was the third high school football player to die in the last week, according to published reports.

Jesinger said police were investigating Cutinella's death.

"It was the result of a typical football play," Superintendent Steven Cohen told reporters Thursday. "It was just a freak accident."

Cutinella stood up after the collision and then collapsed, Cohen said. The player had been blocking for a teammate, Newsday reported.

 

In Alabama, Demario Harris Jr., 17, of Charles Henderson High School in Alabama died Sunday -- two days after making a tackle in a football game, accordin to AL.com.  The official cause of death was not immediately known.  And contrary to various media reports my son had a brain hemorrhage, not an aneurysm, that was caused by a hit he took during Fridays game. He may have had a pre existing condition but there is no way to tell now."

 

On September 26, Isaiah Langston, a 17-year-old student at Rolesville High School in North Carolina, collapsed on the field before a game, according to CNN affiliate WTVD. On Monday, his family confirmed he had died. The official cause of death is not known but his older brother told WTVD that his collapse on the field "had something to do with a blood clot in his brain."

(CNNsports.com)

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18
Sep

3 Out Of 10 NFL Retirees Face Alzheimer's/TBI Recovery

Posted by on in TBI

nfl

The NFL estimates that nearly three in 10 former players will develop debilitating brain conditions, and that they will be stricken earlier and at least twice as often as the general population.

The NFL report said the ex-players' diagnosis rates would be "materially higher than those expected in the general population" and would come at "notably younger ages."

"This report paints a startling picture of how prevalent neurocognitive diseases are among retired NFL players," lead player lawyers Christopher Seeger and Sol Weiss said in a statement.

Critics also lament that the settlement plan offers no awards to anyone diagnosed with CTE in the future, and that the Alzheimer's and dementia awards are cut by 75 percent for players who also suffered strokes.

(ABCnews/sports.com)

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18
Sep

Tips To Keep YOUR Brain Healthy!

Posted by on in TBI

tropical sunset2

1. Use your vacation/time off. Brains think more clearly when not overworking. Give your brain a "timeout." Not using your brain to focus on endless tasks.

2. Sleep. Helps consolidate memories. Lack of, can affect your reaction time and how you process information. Also, lack of sleep can speed up the aging process.

3. Intense Mulit-tasking. We/humans are not computers...no matter what society says. Pair one task that requires less thinking with one that doesn't require as much. (Watching a game on TV....while preparing an appetizer.)

4. Get Vitamin D. Improves brain health! Supports healthy blood vessel function and growth of neurons.

5. Drink Green Tea. Improves attenion span. Caffenine in the beverage helps with memory recall processing.

6. Exercise your brain. Working on a new - challenging skill (language, ceramics, auto shop.)

(cnn/health.com)

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02
Sep

Tom Brady, Elite NFL Quarterback Decides Not Only To Work Out His Body - But Also His Brain!

Posted by on in TBI

         tom brady

 

Tom Brady is no different than most superstar athletes. He’s willing to do whatever it takes to improve his performance on the field. The past few years, that’s even meant using innovative methods to keep his brain in top shape.

With the help of his longtime “body coach” Alex Guerrero, who has kept the Patriots quarterback’s physique finely tuned, Brady has undergone extensive testing and state-of-the-art brain training geared toward sharpening his decision-making skills.As a baseline measure, Brady underwent a functional neuro-cognitive image (FNCI) — or brain scan — that consisted of a half-dozen different cognitive tests.

The technology is such that Guerrero can devise cognitive exercises specifically geared to anyone, be it an NFL quarterback, or a CEO of a large corporation. In Brady’s case, the exercises honed in on what happens after a play is radioed in, and the swiftness with which he must process the information, read the defense, and get everyone on the same page, especially if adjustments need to be made at the line of scrimmage.

Said Guerrero: “We can make (the exercises) position specific, sports specific and be able to train the brain to do what we want it do to.”

So after the deficient areas in Brady’s brain were identified, the nine-time Pro Bowler began doing the appropriate exercises to get back into what is considered the median range. That’s helped the Patriots quarterback become even more adept at reacting and making the necessary split-second decisions.

(BostonHearald.com)

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02
Sep

When Are 3 Concussions Too Much???

Posted by on in TBI

            wes-welker-oversized-helmet-concussion
 (Wes Welker wore an oversized helmet -Left- last season after suffering two concussions.)


     For the third time in 10 months, Wes Welker has been diagnosed with a concussion. The latest head injury for the Broncos wide receiver happened in the second quarter. Welker suffered the concussion after taking a hit from Texans safety D.J. Swearinger with under a minute left to play in the first half. After taking the hit, Welker waved to the sideline for help.

     After the game, Swearinger said he wasn't trying to hurt Welker, "I led with my shoulder; that's the only thing I can do," Swearinger said. "He's a short guy. I led with my shoulder. The results are the results and that's all I can do on that play."

     As for Welker, it's almost impossible to say when he'll return. The Broncos receiver suffered his first concussion of the 2013 season in Week 10 on Nov. 17 and returned to play to the following week.

     The 33-year-old then suffered his second concussion on Dec. 9 and didn't return until the Broncos first playoff game on Jan. 12.

(CBSsports.com)

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02
Sep

NFL Player Suffers Severe Brain Illness, Yet Desire Motivates Him, Despite Possible TBI.

Posted by on in TBI

                  Amobi Okoye

 

    Amobi Okoye, a defensive lineman for the Dallas Cowboys, is fighting overwhelming odds to play in the NFL again.  Diagnosed with a serious brain injury, he hopes to pursue the sport that he loves.

     Okoye first was identified to suffer from anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis, an autoimmune syndrome that causes brain inflammation, in 2013 and it caused him to fall into a coma and suffer a 145-day memory gap that not only threatened to end his NFL dreams but also almost cost him his life.A former first-round pick of the Houston Texans who showed signs of early dominance before his career tailed off, Okoye last played in an NFL game in 2012 with the Chicago Bears. A few months after that, at the start of free agency in 2013, he suffered from a series of seizures in his hometown of Houston. He had just finished a workout and was with his father, Augustine, when Okoye started to convulse.

     Okoye continue to suffer from seizures in three different hospitals, losing his speech in the process, and eventually was placed in a medically indcued coma in an intensive-care unit. It was there that the results of a spinal tap revealed Okoye's rare disease, which Dr. Benjamin Greenberg, an associate professor of neurology and neurotherapeutics and pediatrics at UT Southwestern Medical Center, describes as being "probably in the one-in-a-million range."

     Although Okoye emerged from his coma in July of 2013, he had lost most of his ability to speak and had dropped 78 pounds. Okoye has no memory of anything from March 15 to Aug. 7 of that year. After being released from the hopsital last August, Okoye needed to relearn basic human functions.Even if he doesn't make the Cowboys' roster this season, Okoye's survival and recovery to this point has been an achievement worth a lifetime of praise.

(yahoosports.com)

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08
Aug
08
Aug

Vitamin "D" May Help In the Fight Against Alzheimer's

Posted by on in TBI

                                            vitamin D

Interest in the “sunshine” vitamin has intensified recently as more and more research suggests it may play a role in a variety of diseases associated with aging, including heart disease, some cancers and diabetes.

Vitamin D is called the sunshine vitamin for good reason. The body needs only a few minutes of direct sunlight to generate amounts that are more than adequate. With age, however, skin becomes less efficient at producing vitamin D, so older adults are particularly vulnerable to this deficiency. Vitamin D levels can be measured by blood tests.

“The majority of older adults in the U.S. have deficient levels of vitamin D,” says Llewellyn, “and our findings suggest that this may increase the risk of new cognitive problems and dementia.”

Researchers have begun to think vitamin D is important to brain health by protecting the blood supply to the brain, Llewellyn said at the Alzheimer’s conference Sunday.

“We also suspect that vitamin D may help to clear toxins from the brain,” Llewellyn says, helping to break down amyloid-beta protein, the substance that is thought to play a role in causing Alzheimer’s disease.

(AARP.org/health)

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08
Aug

Swim Gloves/Paddles Are a Great Therapy Tool for Stroke and TBI Recovery

Posted by on in TBI

                                swim glove

Dear Friends,

Swimming is a great low impact workout and aquatic therapy can be a very beneficial exercise that includes your whole body. Swim gloves and paddles come in a range of styles and the web design helps with swim motion and  your propulsion. Adam practiced with a pair and found them to be helpful as he prepared for his snorkel trip to Belize.  (Enjoy the water!  - Alex)

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24
Jul

Using Only 10% of Our Brain May Be a Longtime Myth

Posted by on in TBI

                             brain useage

Reading this, you're probably using, what ... 10% of your brain? Funny how that notion took hold — that we use a tenth of our brain at any given time — because there's no actual evidence for it, the Conversation reports. The idea may date back to psychologist William James, who wrote in 1907 that we use "only a small part of our possible mental and physical resources," and a foreword to Dale Carnegie's How to Win Friends and Influence People that loosely quoted James as saying that "the average person develops only 10% of his latent mental ability." Now, products exist to "unlock the other 90%" and a new thriller, Lucy, shows Scarlett Johansson taking drugs that enable her to use all 100% of her brain.

But, as the Atlantic reports, scientists point out that the brain is an organ packed with living neurons that are always up to something. Brain scans that show only a small active portion of gray matter "lighting up" may confuse people, one neuroscience professor points out, because they show only the brain's major activities, not all of them.

Yet "those kinds of ideas self-perpetuate," he says. One possible basis for the 10% notion: The brain has almost 100 billion neurons, which are outnumbered roughly 10:1 by "glial" cells that keep the brain working.

(USAtoday.com)

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24
Jul

Fish Oil May Protect Against Alzheimer's and Offer Cognitive Hope for TBI Recovery

Posted by on in TBI

                fish oil

 

Fish oil is touted as a magical potion that boosts fertility, heart health, and weight loss and promotes a clear complexion, while lessening the effects of depression, ulcers, diabetes and many more conditions. But there’s another benefit to these glossy little capsules: They may prevent Alzheimer's disease.

A new study of 819 people published in the journal Alzheimer’s & Dementia found that taking fish oil supplements on a daily basis is associated with a significant decrease in cognitive decline (as measured by the Alzheimer's Diseaese Assessment Scale and the Mini Mental State Exam) and brain atrophy — important findings in light of statistics that show that one person per minute is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. 

“We found that fish oil use was associated with better performance on standard tests of memory and thinking abilities over time, compared to those who didn’t take supplements,” lead study author Lore Daiello, a research scientist at the Alzheimer’s Disease and Memory Disorders Center at Rhode Island Hospital, tells Yahoo Health.

The main ingredient in fish oil is DHA, omega-3 fatty acids found in cold-water fatty fish such as salmon, swordfish, trout, yellowfin tuna, mackerel, and more.

(yahoo.com/health)

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15
Jul

Summer Warning - Part Two: Football Players and Parents Concern Over Helmets and TBI Recovery.

Posted by on in TBI

                                       guardian-helmet
With millions of parents and players from Pop Warner to the NFL worrying about concussions and their potentially devastating effects, the claims sound reassuring.

Wear this mouth guard, and you'll be helping to protect yourself from concussions. This skull cap absorbs the blows that can lead to traumatic brain injuries. And that helmet adapts to each hit, minimizing the risk of injury.

There's just one problem: There's no one to verify that those statements, and many others, are true.

While government agencies monitor the safety and effectiveness of food, drugs and automobiles, there's no such group keeping an eye on football helmets or the increasing number of add-on products.

"It feels very much like a lot of companies are coming up with these ideas and they're making money off the fear of parents, and there's no real proof that they're helping," said Emily Cohen, a Berkeley, Calif., mother of two teenage athletes and blogger on TeamSnap, an online managing service for sports teams. "I would like to know, if I'm purchasing a piece of safety equipment, that it's actually going to make a difference."You want to believe because you want your kid to be safe. But you don't know."

Manufacturers can make any claim they want about the effectiveness of their product and, unless they run afoul of the Federal Trade Commission's ad police, there's little to stop them.No helmet or piece of equipment can prevent concussions, or eliminate the risks of them and other head injuries in sports. Almost every website carries a disclaimer that states that, and some are more thorough or blunt than others. But the warnings pale in comparison to the claims of what the products can do.
(USAtoday.com/sports)

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15
Jul

Summer Warning - Part One: Swimming and Deadly Fresh Water Parasite. Little Chance for TBI Recovery

Posted by on in TBI

                ameoba770
A brain-eating amoeba that lurks in fresh water has prompted warnings from Kansas officials after it killed a 9-year-old girl.

Hally Yust was an avid water skier and spent the past few weeks swimming in several bodies of fresh water. She died last week from Naegleria fowleri, a brain-eating parasite that lives in warm, standing water."Her life was taken by a rare amoeba organism that grows in many different fresh water settings. We want you to know this tragic event is very, very rare, and this is not something to become fearful about.""The amoeba ... finds itself way back in our noses and then can work its way into our central nervous system, around our brains," said Dr. William Schaffner of Vanderbilt University Medical Center. "And once it's there, it just causes destruction."

In addition to a severe headache, fever, nausea and vomiting, Naegleria fowleri infections often cause death.

The cases are often reported in the summer, when more swimmers take a dip in fresh water.

The Kansas health department advises swimmers to use nose plugs when swimming in fresh water.

It also suggests not stirring up the sediment at the bottom of shallow freshwater areas and keeping your head above the water in hot springs and other untreated thermal waters.

(CNN.com/health)

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23
Jun

Major League Baseball Introduces New "Safety" Cap

Posted by on in TBI

             alex-torres-new-helmet-restricted-story-top

Alex Torres will never forget the sound that echoed around Tropicana Field from the pitcher's mound on a Saturday afternoon last June.

More than a year after the pitcher's then-Tampa Bay Rays teammate Alex Cobb was struck in the head by a concussing line drive, that sound of ball on skull still resonates.

"I came in after Alex Cobb was hit in the head," Torres told CNN on Sunday. "That's really an impression to me, how his head sounded from the bullpen. That was really bad. I was shaking. 'Oh my God! Oh my God!' I'm glad he's alive."

When the 26-year-old Venezuelan strolled from the bullpen to the mound for the eighth inning of Saturday night's game against the Los Angeles Dodgers, he became the first pitcher to wear a protective cap that MLB approved in January for use by pitchers.

"It's a good idea they make this kind of hat to protect my head," Torres said. "You want to protect life. I don't have a kid yet, but I want to see my kid grow up."

Line drives back to the mound have caused several injuries to pitchers over the past few years, some very serious. Most recently, the Cincinnati Reds' star closer Aroldis Chapman sat out the first six weeks of this season after a line drive in spring training caused fractures to his nose and above his left eye. In the most life-threatening incident, Arizona Diamondback Brandon McCarthy, then pitching for the Oakland A's, took a batted ball to the head in September 2012, then needed brain surgery because of internal bleeding.

The protective caps have padding imbedded inside the side and front. However, the portion of the head below the cap line, where MLB.com says many of the more seriously injured pitchers were struck, remains unprotected.

(CNNsports.com)

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23
Jun

Formula 1 Racing Great, Michael Schumacher, Awakens From 6 Month Coma and Prepares for TBI Recovery

Posted by on in TBI

                    michael schumacher

 

Michael Schumacher, the most successful driver in Formula 1 history, is in critical condition after suffering severe head trauma in a skiing accident in the French Alps on Sunday, hospital officials said.

The 44-year-old German, who retired from the elite motorsport for the second time in 2012, fell and hit his head on a rock, said the director of the Meribel resort where Schumacher was skiing.

Schumacher was in a coma when he arrived at the University Hospital Center of Grenoble and required immediate brain surgery, hospital officials said in a written statement.

But doctors haven't released details about his injuries or his prognosis.


Former F1 driver Michael Schumacher is no longer in a coma and has been transferred from a hospital in Grenoble, France, where he had been admitted after a skiing accident last year, his management said in a statement Monday.

"Michael has left ... to continue his long phase of rehabilitation," according to his manager Sabine Kehm.

 

He will continue his recovery at the University hospital in Lausanne, Switzerland. Officials there confirmed that Schumacher was admitted, but gave no further details about his treatment.

Schumacher, 45, suffered severe head trauma in a skiing accident at the French Alps resort of Meribel on December 29.

(CNNsports.com)

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