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Adam Reborn: A Family Guide to Surviving a Traumatic Brain Injury

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25
Sep

Henry Mayo Hospital Helps With TBI Recovery

Posted by on in TBI

August 18, 2008. 11:00 at night. Adam and Henry Mayo Hospital will forever be linked. And as Henry Mayo continues to grow and build towards a brighter future - so does Adam.

With Henry Mayo's Trauma Team and Trauma Center in place, the life-saving capabilities to assist patients in a quick and efficient manner increase the opportunities for survivial and recovery.

 

Henry Mayo poster far away

 

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18
Sep

"ADAM TBI RECOVERY," IS HAPPY TO HELP SPONSOR THE 2013 NABIS/BETTY CLOONEY CENTER CONFERENCE IN NEW ORLEANS.

Posted by on in TBI

The 11th Annual Conference hosted by the North American Brain Injury Society along with the Betty Clooney Center for TBI Recovery, is slated for this September in New Orleans.

               TBI Louisiana 2

               TBI louisiana

        

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11
Sep

Make Sure To See What You Hit!!!

Posted by on in TBI

         btn-how-to-tackle

Dear Friends, football season is here. If your family or friends are considering playing football  then "Head's Up/USA Football" may be right for them. Skilled coaches offering proper techniques for tackling and all aspects of playing the game are involved. And most importantly, trying to minimize helmet to helmet "head down" hits that could possibly lead to a TBI and then require TBI recovery.

More information can be found regarding "Heads Up" football at usafootball.com

 

Enjoy the game safely - Alex

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11
Sep

If You Have A Brain...One Of These May Apply To You!

Posted by on in TBI

                       brain freeze

Brain Freeze -We all love icey cold foods, especially on a hot summer day, but too much of it too fast can give us a real headache. Who hasn't had a bout of brain freeze immediately after they throw that blizzard back too fast.

Brain freeze is something which most people have heard of, but which they actually know very little about. Generally it is the term given to the feeling you get after eating or drinking something extremely cold. It tends to occur when these foods and drinks are consumed fairly quickly and it is definitely not a very nice experience! So just what is it and why does it occur?What you may not know is that the pain actually occurs from the cold food and drink touching the roof of the mouth. It is the warming, afterwards, of the hard palate that causes the pain rather than the cold as what many people mistakenly think.

 

Brain Drain - Brain drain is also known as “The human capital flight”. It can be simply defined as the mass emigration of technically skilled people from one country to another country.Brain-drain can have many reasons, for example-political instability of a nation, lack of opportunities, health risks, personal conflicts etc.

 

Brainiac - A highly intelligent person.

                                      brainstorming

Brain Storming - Brainstorming combines a relaxed, informal approach to problem solving with lateral thinking. It encourages people to come up with thoughts and ideas that can, at first, seem a bit crazy. Some of these ideas can be crafted into original, creative solutions to a problem, while others can spark even more ideas. This helps to get people unstuck by "jolting" them out of their normal ways of thinking.

 

Brain Fade - Ever heard of the term brain fade? This happens when your mind suddenly thinks blank or black and that you totally forget what you have just studied.

Brain fade is very common to people and does not only experienced by students because as we input new knowledge to our brain, it tends to put the new ones on top of the previous info. And as you place more information on top, the first info becomes older and less available to your immediate recall because your brain has set aside it.

(1- brainhealthandpuzzles.com, 2- thegeminigeek.com, 3- thefreedictionary.com, 4- mindtools.com, 5- studyskillsblog.com)

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01
Sep

Concussions Continue With Upcoming 2013 NFL Season

Posted by on in TBI

Buffalo Bills quarterback Kevin Kolb suffered a concussion in Saturday's preseason loss to the Washington Redskins, a league source told ESPN NFL Insider Adam Schefter.

Per the source, the Bills are proceeding as if the concussion, which was termed "serious," could be career-ending.

Kolb will undergo a battery of tests and the Bills do not want to rush him back even if he can continue his career, the source told Schefter.

While diving for a first down in Saturday's game, Kolb was kneed in the helmet by a Redskins defender. He remained on the field for the final four plays of the drive before departing for the locker room with what the team called concussion-like symptoms.

Kolb, who turned 29 on Saturday, missed time in 2010 and 2012 with concussions, a history that has the Bills concerned.

 (ESPN.com - 2013)

               seth-olsen-injured-

Minnesota Vikings backup offensive lineman Seth Olsen was diagnosed with a concussion after a scary incident that saw him strapped down to a gurney and wheeled off the field in the second quarter of Thursday's preseason finale against the Tennessee Titans.

The injury occurred when Olsen dived to make a low block downfield on a screen pass to teammate Joe Banyard. It appeared a Titans defensive lineman's right knee struck Olsen in the head before he landed face-down on the turf.

There was a roughly 10-minute delay as a medical team worked to pad Olsen's head and strap him down, with the Vikings' entire team forming a semicircle on the field. Olsen was conscious as he left the field on the gurney and raised his left hand to acknowledge the crowd.

(usatoday.com - 2013)

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01
Sep

NFL Settles $765 Million Dollar Concussion Lawsuit With Players. TBI Recovery Forthcoming.

Posted by on in TBI

(Dear friends, ironically enough the week the NFL and its players settled a ongoing concussion lawsuit - two more active players came down with head injuries. - Alex)

                           tdy nfl settlement

After two months of negotiations, the NFL has settled with the more than 4,500 former NFL players in their joint lawsuit involving concussion-related injuries.

This settlement seems like a positive outcome for the NFL, especially considering the league's efforts to try to distance itself from perceptions that the league did not take concussions seriously enough.

Had the plaintiffs continued with litigation and been able to prove the NFL "hid information" or that their injuries were directly caused by football activities, it would have been a serious issue, not just monetarily.

The league is making it known that they are taking steps to make the game safer at all levels, and that the funding detailed in the settlement will strive to make that a reality.

In the past, the NFL and its players did not have the same knowledge and medical awareness of concussions and their long-term impact that is available to those in the modern game.

This decision will hopefully help those former players who have suffered from head injuries and trauma, as well as their families. At the same time, the league and its current players will continue to strive for more player safety moving forward.

(bleacherreport.com - 2013)

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01
Sep

Will Concussions/TBI Be The End Of Football?

Posted by on in TBI

football concussions

Author Malcolm Gladwell has been a voice in the concussion fray before, calling schools to ban college football and saying he wouldn’t be surprised if football at all levels fades from existence once people realize how damaging it can be long-term for players with head injuries.

But in a new documentary, Gladwell offers a less extreme — and possibly more likely — scenario for what will happen to the game. Gladwell says football will be a game that capitalizes on those poor or desperate enough to take the risk.

“We will go to a middle position where we will disclose the risks and essentially dare people to play,” Gladwell said in the film, which comes out Friday, as reported by CBSSports.com. “… That’s what the Army does. So we leave the Army for kids who have no other options, for whom the risks are acceptable. That’s what football is going to become. It’s going to become the Army. That’s a very, very different situation.

“His assertion is that it’s going to stay relevant at least for the time being in lower-income areas and then also football hotbeds such as Ohio, Pennsylvania, certainly Texas — places where it transcends socioeconomic conditions,” Pamphilon said.

The concussion issue has ramped up in recent days, with the NFL agreeing Thursday to a $765 million settlement for a lawsuit brought by former NFL players. While the league is agreeing to pay for medical care for former players and to set up further research into concussions, the settlement allows the NFL to sidestep questions about whether it masked concerns about concussions until it faced outside pressure in recent years.

(www.MSN.foxsports.com/nflstory)

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18
Aug

The Tradition Continues! (Five Years of TBI Recovery and not Giving Up)

Posted by on in TBI

                         doughnuts

Five years ago today it happened. A forty foot fall that impacted so many lives. However, Adam's determination to get better has never waivered. With the help of family, friends, faith and therapy, he continues on his path to recovery.

Tonight, as for the past five years, Adam will visit Henry Mayo Hospital - Emergency - where he was stabilized and helped back to life that fateful night. He will say thanks and as always, bring a couple dozen donuts for the night staff. (Hopefully, he won't have sampled all the jellies.)

Thank you to the nurses, doctors and therapists at Henry Mayo as well as Northridge Medical Hospital, Providence Holy Cross and Mobile Rehab Physical Therapy.

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18
Aug

Can A Sport Be Too Violent? Too Dangerous?

Posted by on in TBI

(Dear friends, much like boxing, MMA (Mixed Martial Arts) requires both fighters to strike vicious punches and brutal blows against one another. Hopefully, a TBI and TBI recovery will not be an end result, however, over time it seems inevitable. In this recent fight, after kicking her opponent to the head, the fighter then followed with a punch to the face and hit her opponent so hard, she broke her own hand.)

 jinh-yu-ko2

In what Yahoo! Sports is calling “one of the year’s most memorable knockouts,” Jinh Yu knocked out Darla Harris in just 24 seconds during an MMA bout at the Sugar Creek Showdown in Oklahoma.

Yu connected with a kick to the head before delivering two power lefts that dropped Harris.

 

 The combat, contact sport of the Mixed Martial Arts, or MMA, implements various disciplines including judo, karate, kickboxing, and wrestling. Persons participating in a match, wear little protective gear.

Also known as cage fighting or ultimate fighting, the athletes involved have only one objective, win the match, by knockout, technical knockout or opponent submission. Fighters utilize grappling moves, which includes chokeholds, or strikes, consisting of kicks, kneeing or punches, to overcome an adversary. Since 2007, the sport has seen at least two fatalities as a direct result of traumatic brain injury (TBI).

 

MMA and TBI

Due to the seemingly barbaric violence of the sport, the Canadian Medical Association called for a ban on MMA. Several US states and legislators have already banned the sport. From 2001 to 2004, John Hopkins Medical University studied 171 MMA matches, exploring the ratio and extent of injury associated with the sport. 68.6% of the fighters received varying degrees of trauma, from lacerations to fractures of the eye, ear, face, jaw and nose because of blunt force. Fifty-four percent of the time, fighters won matches because of a technical knockout.

(www.theblaze.com-2013)

(www.braininjurylawcenter.com)

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18
Aug

Health Tip: Simple Everyday Habit May Help Prevent Alzheimer's

Posted by on in TBI

(Dear Friends, research has indicated that a TBI may cause Alzheimer's to develop in some people's later years. One small and easy way to possibly combat the disease is a simple matter of hygiene. Alex)

 toothbrush

Taking great care of your teeth—with daily brushing and flossing—may dramatically cut risk for Alzheimer’s disease, according to surprising new research.

British scientists report finding signs of gum-disease bacteria in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients. The new study adds to a rapidly growing body of evidence strongly linking periodontal (gum) disease to greatly increased risk for the memory-robbing disorder.

Byproducts of this bacterium, known as Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis), were found in brain samples of four out of ten Alzheimer’s patients, but not in samples from ten people of similar age without dementia, according to the study published in Journal Of Alzheimer's Disease.

P. gingivalisis commonly found in people with chronic periodontal (gum) disease, and can enter the bloodstream through such everyday activities as eating, brushing, and invasive dental treatments, and from there, potentially travel to the brain.

The new British study discussed above adds to a 2012 study in which 158 cognitively normal people were checked for antibodies to gum-disease bacteria in their blood (indicating exposure to these bugs).

People with the antibodies were more likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease (AD) or cognitive impairment in later years than were people without the antibodies, suggesting that “periodontal disease could potentially contribute to AD onset/progression,” the researchers concluded.

(Health.yahoo.net/experts-dayinhealth)

 

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18
Aug

Brain Eating Warning Issued In Florida Due To Waterborne Parasite

Posted by on in TBI

virus  water borne parasite

As a 12-year old boy fights for his life in Miami, the Florida Department of Health has issued a warning to anyone who might come in contact with warm freshwater.

Zachary Reyna is the second child in several weeks to suffer from the deadly parasite known as primary amoebic meningoencephalitis; the first was 12-year old Kali Hardig, an Arkansas girl. Hardig spent several weeks in intensive care after contracting the parasite at a water park but is now in rehab after receiving an experimental anti-amoeba drug. Now, Reyna’s parents hope the same drug will help him recover.

The Reyna family says Zachary was knee-boarding in shallow water with some friends on August 3; the next day, he slept the afternoon away. Because it was so out of the ordinary for him to rest that much, his parents took him to the emergency room, where he was diagnosed with the illness. He has since had brain surgery, and now his family waits to see if the medicine will work.

The Arkansas water park where Kali likely contracted the parasite has been shut down for the time being, because a previous case of the illness was reported there in 2010.

“Based on the occurrence of two cases of this rare infection in association with the same body of water and the unique features of the park, the ADH has asked the owner of Willow Springs to voluntarily close the water park to ensure the health and safety of the public,” the health department said.

Florida officials say that high water temperatures and low levels are breeding grounds for the amoeba and that the best way to avoid it are to stay away from swimming in freshwater during those times. If it can’t be avoided, they say, use nose plugs to keep the water out. Symptoms include headache, fever, nausea, vomiting and a stiff neck, according to the CDC.

“Later symptoms include confusion, lack of attention to people and surroundings, loss of balance, seizures and hallucinations,” the CDC says. “After the start of symptoms, the disease progresses rapidly and usually causes death within one to 12 days.”

A similar infection caused Aimee Copeland o lose both hands, a leg and a foot last year after she cut herself while ziplining over a Georgia lake. Bacteria from the water got into her wound and spread rapidly, but doctors were able to save her life.

(www.webpronenews.com)

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17
Aug

Shaken Baby Syndrome (TBI) Can Be Prevented

Posted by on in TBI

crying baby

Shaken Baby Syndrome (SBS), a form of abusive head trauma (AHT) and inflicted traumatic brain injury (ITBI), is a preventable and severe form of physical child abuse. It results from violently shaking an infant by the shoulders, arms, or legs. SBS may result from both shaking alone or from impact (with or without shaking). The resulting whiplash effect can cause bleeding within the brain or the eyes.Nearly all victims of SBS suffer serious health consequences and at least one of every four babies who are violently shaken dies from this form of child maltreatment. Research shows that shaking most often results from crying or other factors that may trigger the person caring for the baby to become frustrated or angry.

The fact is that crying—including long bouts of inconsolable crying—is normal developmental behavior in infants. The problem is not the crying; however, it’s how caregivers respond to it. Picking up a baby and shaking, throwing, hitting, or hurting him/her is never an appropriate response.

Everyone, from caregivers to bystanders, can do something to prevent SBS. Giving parents and caregivers tools to know how they can cope if they find themselves becoming frustrated are important components of any SBS prevention initiative.

You can play a key role in reinforcing prevention through helping people understand the dangers of violently shaking a baby, the risk factors and the triggers for it, and ways to lessen the load on stressed out parents and caregivers.  All of which may help to reduce the number of children impacted by SBS.

(www.CDC.gov/sbs - Concussion)

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07
Aug

TBI Recovery Team Is Here To Help

Posted by on in TBI

Dear Friends, do not just sit in the waiting rooms. Get to know your therapists. Listen to their skilled advice. Be involved with your loved one's therapies. Being a coach can help your loved one more than just being a spectator. - Alex.

 physical therapy

 

 Rehabilitation for TBI can be a long, slow and difficult journey for the person and his or her family. The healing of any physical injury takes time but when the brain has been damaged, recovery involves far more than just rebuilding tissue. TBI survivors frequently have to relearn simple physical skills like brushing their teeth, dressing themselves, bathing, etc. Occupational therapy is often a key component of a person's recovery plan and has the best effect when reinforced by supportive family members.

Wherever the person is treated ' at home, in a nursing home, through a hospital out-patient rehabilitation clinic, or in an independent living center ' he or she will do best with the support of a team consisting of healthcare professionals and family members. Working together, they can find the best living arrangement for the TBI survivor and provide ongoing healthcare, and perhaps an appropriate mentoring program. In addition to day to day caregivers, this team will likely include:

Physiatrist ' a physician who specializes in physical medicine and rehabilitation

Physical Therapist ' a professionalwho evaluates the person's physical capabilities and develops a program to help them walk, improve their balance, and increase their mobility skills.

Occupational Therapist ' a professional who accesses and works on a patient's visual, cognitive, and perceptual skills. Through OT exercises, basic yet essential skills such as dressing, eating, housework, etc. can be relearned and mastered to help the person recover some of their independence.

Speech and Language Pathologist ' a professional who evaluates the patient's ability to understand the speech of others and express themselves verbally. Enhancing a TBI survivor's communication skills can have a huge impact on their rate of recovery and family dynamics.

Neuropsychologist ' a professional who analyzes and tracks the injured person's ability toproblem solve, put things in sequence, and make rational choices. Based on their findings a course of action is developed to help the TBI survivor overcome or cope with any disabilities.

Social Worker ' a professional who often works with everyone in the family on how to handle the stress and financial burdens they may be facing during this crisis. A social worker also suggests community agencies that could help the family with these challenges.

(www.Mindsourcsesolutions.com)

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31
Jul

Tips For A Better Sleep To Help Refresh Your Brain

Posted by on in TBI

Sleep Helps Protect Your Brain

 1349703174 sleeping-brain

This good feeling may be a result of the anti-inflammtaory effects of sleep.  Chronic brain inflammation appears to contribute to cellular deterioration that can lead to Alzheimer's disease.  Getting a good night's sleep has a positive impact on that inflammatory process and may explain why people who sleep well regularly often look younger and have more energy. 

Scientific evidence tells us that actually sleeping on our problems is an efficient way to solve them.  During sleep, our brain's memory centers are busy consolidating recall for more effective memory when we're awake.  Sleeping well is an important way to improve your memory ability and may lower risk for cognitive decline.

 The following are a few strategies to consider if you're having trouble falling or staying asleep through the night.

  • Stay up during the day.  A daytime nap can be invigorating, but if you already suffer from sleeplessness at night, try not to nap so you'll feel more fatigued at bedtime.
  • Avoid evening liquids.  After dinner, try not to drink large quantities of water or other drinks.  A full bladder can awaken you during the night and you may have trouble getting back to sleep.
  • Stay mellow in the evening.  Watching lively nighttime sports or an exciting movie thriller tends to hype some people up, making it harder for them to fall asleep.
  • Avoid caffeine at night.  Whether it's from tea, coffee, soda or even a chocolate bar, caffeine can keep us awake, so avoid it in the evenings.  Try to skip coffee entirely in the late afternoon and evening.
  • Maintain good sleep habits.  It helps to get into bed at the same time each night.  Try to skip watching TV, eating, or even reading a book.  Simply turn out the light and take a few moments to get settled.  If you are not asleep after 20 minutes, get out of bed and do something else until you feel tired again.  Once you go back to bed, get settled, and give it another 20 minutes.  Every time you get into bed to sleep, try remaining still and focus on slow, steady breathing.
  • (www.PsychologyToday.com-2012) 
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31
Jul

College Football To Introduce New Style Helmet To Cut Down On Potential Concussions

Posted by on in TBI

padded helmet

 

When the University of South Carolina opens preseason football practice Friday night, the plan is to have the Gamecocks, including defensive star Jadeveon Clowney, outfitted in Guardian Caps. The padded shells, made of polyurethane fabric, are designed to fit over helmets and reduce impacts to the head.

There's controversy whether the caps violate helmet certification standards. But South Carolina tried 32 of them on linemen in the spring, liked them and bought 75 more to go team-wide for practice, says athletic trainer Clint Haggard.

"I've talked to our team physicians and discussed all that stuff, and I've talked to a bunch of people around the country," says Haggard. "And we're still going to use them. ... It seems like it will help."

The Guardian Caps have compartments padded with foam rubber that are arranged on top of the helmets, and Hanson says using these compartments dissipates energy better than a solid shell. One issue is whether soft shells might stick together or be more easily grabbed and cause neck injuries. Hanson says his caps "just slip off of each other."

(USAToday.com/Sports/2013)

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31
Jul

Wii Video Games Can Assist Therapists With Stroke/TBI Recovery

Posted by on in TBI

IMG 20130731 161806 683

 

Recreational/Occupational Therapy for Stroke or TBI victims can be found with the Wii style video games. Therapists can have patients use weakened limbs to better incorporate hand-eye coordination. The games are "fun" to play, thus having patients more eager for therapy...which can be benefitial in transferring over to day to day fucnctions...such as standing, or using their hands for openeing doors, turning on lights or grooming. The fast moving/split second decisions made while playing a game of Tennis, for instance, helps with restoring quick cognetive decision making.

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22
Jul

Snake Bite Causes Brain Hemorrhaging

Posted by on in TBI

Golden Lancehead 2

Welcome to Ilha de Queimada Grande, a 110-acre uninhabited island off the coast of Brazil, but locals refer to it as "snake island." And with good reason! The island is home to the Golden Lancehead snake, a super poisonous reptile whose bite causes bleeding orifices, brain hemorrhaging, and kidney failure. Yikes! Researchers claim there is one snake for every square meter of land, which makes the island so dangerous that the Brazilian Navy doesn't allow humans to even go there.  

(Screen.Yahoo.com - 2013)

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22
Jul

Jahvid Best Released By the Detroit Lions Due To History Of Multiple Concussions

Posted by on in TBI

javhid best

The Lions formally announced the release of the fourth-year running back in a press release on the team's official website. Detroit general manager Martin Mayhew released a statement in accordance with Best's dismissal, applauding the young man's work ethic during his time with the franchise.

While salary-cap ramifications undoubtedly played a role in Best's release, it's his inability to stay on the field that was the ultimate impetus for this move. A former first-round pick by Detroit in 2010, Best burst onto the scene with 555 yards rushing and 487 yards receiving as a rookie, and was well on his way to a fine sophomore season before the injury bug bit him.

The slight back, who had a history of concussions dating back to his collegiate days at Cal, suffered his second concussion of the 2011 season against the San Fransisco 49ers on Oct. 16, 2011 and was placed on season-ending injured reserve.

He hasn't played a down of organized football since. Best was expected to come back to the Lions' lineup at the beginning of the 2012 season and participated in the team's OTAs and other activities. However, doctors never felt comfortable clearing him to play due to post-concussion symptoms. Best was kept on the physically unable to perform list, a move that effectively ended his season in November.

(Bleacher Report - 2013)

 

(Dear Friends, Adam played football in high school and remains an avid NFL fan. It can be a very demanding and punishing game, however, if family or relatives of yours play the game...make sure they listen to coaches regarding proper tackling techniques, do not launch forward using the helmet as a weapon and report any head injury to a physician.)

 

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22
Jul

NFL Considering Neck Strength As An Area To Reduce Concussions and Promote TBI Recovery

Posted by on in TBI

Tackled 

The Baltimore Ravens won Super Bowl XLVII with one of the NFL’s most loaded rosters.

But what good is talent if players can’t stay on the field or quickly recover from injuries?

Ravens strength coach Bob Rogucki delivered a reminder of that last week when speaking at the third-annual Football Strength Clinic in Cincinnati. The event focused on ways in which neck strength for male and female athletes who play high school, college or pro sports can be developed in an effort to reduce concussion risk.

While not as publicized as other NFL anti-concussion measures, there is scientific research that shows a muscular neck likely defuses the potentially damaging forces sometimes generated when a player is hit in the head. The larger the “cylinder,” the better the chance that the neck will serve as a shock-absorber to lessen stress placed on the skull.

The NFL isn’t convinced enough yet by existing neck-concussion research to implement a mandatory training protocol for all 32 teams. In a statement to FOX Sports, the NFL head, neck and spine committee says every team’s strength and conditioning program emphasizes “neck muscles in one form or another.” But how much importance neck training carries in a weight program varies from coach to coach.

Incoming NFL players are a different story. Neck strength is a weak point among many of the college prospects who enter the league each year. That could lead to concussion problems or greater risk for them at the NFL level.

(Msn.FoxSports.com - 2013)

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09
Jul

Brain Implants May Assist with TBI Recovery

Posted by on in TBI

brain-implants2

For 15 years, people have been having brain implants to provide deep brain stimulation to treat epilepsy and Parkinson's disease -- a reported 80,000 people have now had such devices placed in their brains. So many of the hurdles have already been overcome -- particularly the "yuck factor" and the fear factor.

"It's now commonly accepted that humans will have electrodes put in them -- it's done for epilepsy, deep brain stimulation, (that has made it) easier for investigative research, it's much more acceptable now than five to 10 years ago," Hampson says.

Much of the work that remains now is in shrinking down the electronics.

Rob Hampson, associate professor of physiology and pharmacology at Wake Forest University, agrees. "We keep pushing forward, every time I put an estimate on it, it gets shorter and shorter."

The scientists -- who bring varied skills to the table, including mathematical modeling and psychiatry -- believe they have cracked how long-term memories are made, stored and retrieved and how to replicate this process in brains that are damaged, particularly by stroke or localized injury.

"Right now it's not a device, it's a fair amount of equipment,"Hampson says. "We're probably looking at devices in the five to 10 year range for human patients."

The ultimate goal in memory research would be to treat Alzheimer's Disease but unlike in stroke or localized brain injury, Alzheimer's tends to affect many parts of the brain, especially in its later stages, making these implants a less likely option any time soon.

(www.cnn.com/tech-2013)


 

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