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Adam Reborn: A Family Guide to Surviving a Traumatic Brain Injury

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02
Jun

Can Diabetes Effect the Brain to Shrink?

Posted by on in TBI

                  shrink-brain

It's not a secret that some diabetics also have memory issues, but a new study suggests it's not just due to clogging of blood vessels - your brain may actually be shrinking.

When the brain shrinks, it's often because valuable brain cells that help us think and remember are dying. A loss of brain cells is a hallmark for Alzheimer's disease and other types of dementia.

In this new study, published in the journal Radiology, researchers looked at brain scans from a little more than 600 people age 55 and older with type 2 diabetes.  They found that patients who lived with diabetes the longest had smaller brain volumes.

"When you lose brain cells, you lose the capacity for more complex thoughts and memory," says Dr. R. Nick Bryan, lead author of the study.

"Somehow diabetes is doing something to the brain that results in tissue loss (death of cells)," says Dr. Rosebud Roberts, professor of epidemiology and neurology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, who was not involved with this new research.

(TheChart/CNN.com)

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02
Jun

2014 Washington State TBI Conference Offers Help & Hope To Those In Need

Posted by on in TBI

Dear Friends,

Adam and I were honored to be a part of the conference as guest-speakers. At the event a person's politcal, religious or social background/belief didn't matter. For here the only fact and cause that did matter - was the desire to help others.  Take care to all. (Alex.)

 

conference3

 

 

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19
May

Politics and TBI/TBI Recovery

Posted by on in TBI

                                    rove - clinton

Republican strategist and American Crossroads founder Karl Rove says he didn’t say Hillary Rodham Clinton may have “brain damage” from a 2012 concussion and blood clot, as reported in the New York Post on Thursday. But he says the former secretary of State “has hidden a lot” about the episode and will have to reveal more if she runs for president.

Rove made the comments about Clinton and brain damage last week at a conference in California, the Post reported Monday. “Thirty days in the hospital? And when she reappears, she’s wearing glasses that are only for people who have traumatic brain injury? We need to know what’s up with that,” the newspaper quoted him as saying.

Clinton, 66, was hospitalized for three days and was away from the State Department for a month during her illness, which began in December 2012 with a virus. While ill, she fell and suffered a concussion; in a follow-up exam, doctors discovered a blood clot located between her skull and brain behind her ear. She was treated with blood thinners.

(DetroitFreePress.com)

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19
May

A Better Education May Result In Greater TBI Recovery

Posted by on in TBI

                            college graduates

New research suggests that people with more education recover significantly better from serious head injuries.

Scientists from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore found that adults with moderate to severe traumatic brain injuries who had earned at least an undergraduate degree were more than seven times as likely to completely recover from their injury than those who didn't finish high school.

The research focused on how "cognitive reserve" -- the brain's ability to maintain function despite damage -- affects recovery from traumatic brain injury. The results echo previous research in Alzheimer's dementia suggesting that more years of education, believed to lead to more effective brain use and greater cognitive reserve, slows progression of symptoms.

"I'm not sure we can quite say you should stay in school based on this study alone. But if one looks at the dementia literature, maintaining the health of your brain by being actively involved in your life is important," said study author Eric Schneider, an epidemiologist and assistant professor of surgery at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

"And in the unlikely event of injury to your brain, it may help," he added.

(CBSNews.com)

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19
May

No TBI Recovery for Zombies

Posted by on in TBI

                  zombies-

Never fear the night of the living dead -- the Pentagon has got you covered.

From responses to natural disasters to a catastrophic attack on the homeland, the U.S. military has a plan of action ready to go if either incident occurs.

It has also devised an elaborate plan should a zombie apocalypse befall the country, according to a Defense Department document obtained by CNN.

In an unclassified document titled "CONOP 8888," officials from U.S. Strategic Command used the specter of a planet-wide attack by the walking dead as a training template for how to plan for real-life, large-scale operations, emergencies and catastrophes.

Zombie life forms "created via some form of occult experimentation in what might otherwise be referred to as 'evil magic,' to vegetarian zombies that pose no threat to humans due to their exclusive consumption of vegetation, to zombie life forms created after an organism is infected with a high dose of radiation are among the invaders the document outlines."

"The only assumed way to effectively cause causalities to the zombie ranks by tactical force is the concentration of all firepower to the head, specifically the brain," the plan reads. "The only way to ensure a zombie is 'dead' is to burn the zombie corpse."

(Cnn.com)

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19
May

Ex Browns QB Bernie Kosar Fired for Concussion or Being Drunk?

Posted by on in TBI

                bernie kosar

Bernie Kosar, who was sacked by his own team from doing analysis on the Browns’ preseason telecasts, wants his job back.

Kosar said he was fired because of his “slurred speech impairment, which is a direct result of the many concussions I received while playing in the NFL.” Kosar also appealed to the team and station to reinstate him.

Former Browns quarterback Bernie Kosar has a court date scheduled for today stemming from his drunk driving arrest last year.

The officer who pulled Kosar over says that when asked for his license, Kosar instead handed over two credit cards. The officer said there was a strong odor of alcohol coming from Kosar, and that Kosar failed a field sobriety test. Kosar told police that he was unable to perform sobriety tests because of football injuries, which he told officers were because “his line couldn’t block,” according to police.

Kosar’s slurred speech was noticeable when he was hired for the job, however, which raises the question of why he would get fired for it now if the Browns and WKYC didn’t have any problem with his speech at the time they hired him.

(Yahoosports.com, profootballtalk.com)

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19
May

2014 NFL Draft Hints at Upcoming Season and Reminds of Football TBI

Posted by on in TBI

                            russell allen

Jaguars linebacker Russell Allen thought he had his bell rung against the Bills in Week 15 last season. He played through the injury and double vision, but two days later found out he’d suffered a stroke on the field. A dead spot in his brain means he’ll never play football again.

In the back of the brain, the cerebellum tells the body how to walk, run and even crawl. It might also play a role in discerning happiness and fear, but the medical science isn’t exactly sure. What doctors are sure of, however, is that Russell has a spot on his cerebellum, no bigger than a dime, that is dead.

“It was strange because it was so routine,” Allen says. “We hit, I got off the block, no big deal. I felt something flash—like they say when you get your bell rung. I didn’t lose consciousness. I walked back to the huddle and finished the drive.”

 (SportsIllustrated.com)

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04
Apr

Routine Dental Work Puts Mother In Coma

Posted by on in TBI

                         checkups

A Hawaii woman went in for routine dental work on Monday but ... didn't wake up. Kristen Tavares, 23, was to have four wisdom teeth removed; during the procedure "she went into cardiac arrest and they had to use a defibrillator and shocked her, stunned her heart," her boyfriend tells Hawaii News Now. The mother of a three-month-old baby and a son, 4, is now in a coma, and a CT scan shows some swelling in the brain, a separate Hawaii News Now story notes. What went wrong still remains a mystery.


"Statistically it's usually an airway issue," a doctor not related to Tavares' care explains. "Perhaps a foreign body drops into the airway like a tooth, or a piece of gauze or perhaps the patient might vomit and get fluid up their airway and then down into their lungs. That's why we have them don't eat or drink before a general anesthetic or any anesthetic."

(Shine.yahoo.com)

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04
Apr

Crafting/Knitting Can Relieve Anxiety/Stress and Improve Brain Functions

Posted by on in TBI

                                        knitting

Crafting can help those who suffer from anxiety, depression or chronic pain, experts say. It may also ease stress, increase happiness and protect the brain from damage caused by aging.

Little research has been done specifically on crafting, but neuroscientists are beginning to see how studies on cognitive activities such as doing crossword puzzles might also apply to someone who does complex quilting patterns. Others are drawing connections between the mental health benefits of meditation and thezen reached while painting or sculpting.

"There's promising evidence coming out to support what a lot of crafters have known anecdotally for quite some time," says Catherine Carey Levisay, a clinical neuropsychologist and wife of Craftsy.com CEO John Levisay. "And that's that creating -- whether it be through art, music, cooking, quilting, sewing, drawing, photography (or) cake decorating -- is beneficial to us in a number of important ways."

"When we are involved in (creativity), we feel that we are living more fully than during the rest of life," Csikszentmihalyi said during a TED talk in 2004. "You know that what you need to do is possible to do, even though difficult, and sense of time disappears. You forget yourself. You feel part of something larger."

Our nervous system is only capable of processing a certain amount of information at a time, he explains. That's why you can't listen and understand two people who are talking to you at once. So when someone starts creating, his existence outside that activity becomes "temporarily suspended."

(CNN/Health.com)

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25
Mar

TBI Recovery Can Come In Many Forms - Music - Melody Gardot

Posted by on in TBI

                        melody gardot seattle WA

 

While cycling in Philadelphia in November 2003she was hit by a car whose driver had ignored a red traffic light. In the accident she suffered serious head and spinal injuries and her pelvis was broken in two places. Because of these severe injuries she was confined to her hospital bed for a year and had to remain lying on her back. As a further consequence of her injuries she had to re-learn simple tasks such as brushing her teeth and walking. The most noticeable effect of the neural injuries she suffered is that she was left hyper-sensitive to both light and sound, therefore requiring her to wear dark sunglasses at nearly all times to shield her eyes. The accident also resulted in both long and short term memory problems and difficulty with her sense of time.

Music involving listening and making a verbal attempt to sing or hum is thought to help the brain form new pathways.

(Wikipedia.com)

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25
Mar

Sleep Loss Can Add To TBI

Posted by on in TBI

                                           sleep loss

Are you a truck driver or shift worker planning to catch up on some sleep this weekend?

Cramming in extra hours of shut-eye may not make up for those lost pulling all-nighters, new research indicates.

The damage may already be done -- brain damage, that is, said neuroscientist Sigrid Veasey from the University of Pennsylvania.

The widely held idea that you can pay back a sizeable "sleep debt" with long naps later on seems to be a myth, she said in a study published this week in the Journal of Neuroscience.

Long-term sleep deprivation saps the brain of power even after days of recovery sleep, Veasey said. And that could be a sign of lasting brain injury.

Veasey and her colleagues at the University of Pennsylvania medical school wanted to find out, so, they put laboratory mice on a wonky sleep schedule that mirrors that of shift workers.

They let them snooze, then woke them up for short periods and for long ones.

Then the scientists looked at their brains -- more specifically, at a bundle of nerve cells they say is associated with alertness and cognitive function, the locus coeruleus.

They found damage and lots of it.

"The mice lose 25% of these neurons," Veasey said.

This is how the scientists think it happened.

When the mice lost a little sleep, nerve cells reacted by making more of a protein, called sirtuin type 3, to energize and protect them.

But when losing sleep became a habit, that reaction shut down. After just a few days of "shift work" sleep, the cells start dying off at an accelerated pace.

The discovery that long-term sleep loss can result in a loss of brain cells is a first, Veasey said.

(CNN/Health.com)

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08
Mar

Dear Friends, how about a Real/Fun Fact?! (# 832 - "Brain waves can power an electric train!")

Posted by on in TBI

Snapple fact

With the weather getting warmer, or like Adam coming home from the gym after a workout, maybe you're looking for a refreshing drink. Ever try a Snapple? And make sure to check under the cap for a "fun fact." (They bring a smile to our family.) For instance, #933..."a crocodile can't stick out its tongue."  Or, how about, #783..."men get hiccups more than women."

Some of my favorites...#786..."the brain operates on the same amount of power as a 10-watt light bulb."  Or #784..."the brain is about 80% water."

And just for laughs...#801..."it is not possible to tickle yourself!"

All the best to all of you,

 

Alex

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08
Mar

Children Hitting Their Heads. What to do?

Posted by on in TBI

                must know facts about head bumps

The following is a list of signals that tell you that you need to talk with your pediatrician.

If your child is (or has):

  • Under six months of age
  • Unconscious, even briefly
  • Crying for longer than 10 minutes or prolonged irritability
  • Vomiting repeatedly
  • Bleeding or other liquid draining from the ears, mouth, or nose
  • Rapid swelling just above the ear
  • Bruising around the ear or eye
  • Unable to walk or talk normally
  • Acting strangely or drowsy
  • Unequal pupil size

 

If any of these symptoms or situations are present or if you have any concerns, call your physician right away. Your child may be fine, but you should be in touch with an expert. If your child is unable to get up by herself immediately after the head injury, don’t move her. Call 911 and wait for emergency help to arrive.

(drGreene.com)

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08
Mar

A TBI Can Change A Life Forever. Help Prevent One From Happening.

Posted by on in TBI

A traumatic brain injury is damage to the brain caused by an impact or jolt to the head such as from a car accident. Most traumatic brain injuries in teens and adults are caused by assaults, falls and car and motorcycle accidents.

Protect your head when engaging in various activities such as skiing, skateboarding and bike riding. Always wear a helmet that fits properly.
 
Take a break from a crying baby if needed to prevent losing control and shaking the baby.
 
                CarseatKid
 
Wear your seat belt and be sure young children are buckled in a car seat. Car accidents even at low speeds can cause a traumatic brain injury.
 
Reduce the risk of falls. Fall prevention is especially important for young children and seniors. Install lights near staircases. Keep in mind young children can fall out windows if there are not safety measures.
 (eHow.com)
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20
Feb

Your Child's Brain Is In Danger!

Posted by on in TBI

                         neuron1

The number of chemicals known to be toxic to children's developing brains has doubled over the last seven years, researchers said.Dr. Philip Landrigan at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York and Dr. Philippe Grandjean from Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, authors of the review published Friday in The Lancet Neurology journal, say the news is so troubling they are calling for a worldwide overhaul of the regulatory process in order to protect children's brains.

"We know from clinical information on poisoned adult patients that these chemicals can enter the brain through the blood brain barrier and cause neurological symptoms," said Grandjean.

"When this happens in children or during pregnancy, those chemicals are extremely toxic, because we now know that the developing brain is a uniquely vulnerable organ. Also, the effects are permanent."

The two have been studying industrial chemicals for about 30 years. In 2006, they published data identifying five chemicals as neurotoxicants -- substances that impact brain development and can cause a number of neurodevelopmental disabilities including attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, autism, dyslexia and other cognitive damage, they said.

At greatest risk? Pregnant women and small children, according to Grandjean. According to the review, the biggest window of vulnerability occurs in utero, during infancy and early childhood.

"We're talking about emotion problems, less impulse control, (being) more likely to make bad decisions, get into trouble, be dyslexic and drop out of school. ... These are problems that are established early, but travel through childhood, adolescence, even into adult life."

(cnn.com/health/chemicals)

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20
Feb

Jacqueline Hernandez - Winter Olympics Snowboader Suffers Head Injury - Even The Best Can Get Hurt

Posted by on in TBI

                olympics-snowboardcross

Jackie Hernandez is an American snowboarder that had medal dreams for the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, but those ended before they ever really got started. On Feb. 16, 2014, the Chicago Tribune reported that she crashed in her opening snowboard run during qualifying and ended up suffering a concussion.

The accident happened as she was nearing the end of the 1,200-meter course when she slammed her head into the snow and was knocked unconscious.

The 21-year-old Jackie Hernandez sat up for a few minutes and was even talking to the medics before she was transported down the mountain. It was then determined that she had suffered a concussion.

(examiner.com)

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11
Feb

Hollywood Delivers Amazing TBI Performances

Posted by on in TBI

lookout   Reguarding henry

Dear Friends,

The Academy Awards will soon be here. If you are ever in the mood for watching an emotional, powerful dramatic performance, centering on TBI of different degrees,  then perhaps  Cliff Robertson's Oscar winning role in "Charly,"  or Harrison Ford in "Regarding Henry," or Joseph Gordon Levitt in "The Lookout,"  to Robert De Niro in "Awakenings,"  may be the picture for you. They are standout roles across the board. And they bring to cinema life the hardships and emotions of dealing with and overcoming the challenges of a TBI.

All the best - Alex

(wikipedia)

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07
Feb

SuperBowl Seahawk's Owner, Paul Allen, Funds Large TBI Recovery Program

Posted by on in TBI

                          2013 US Richest Sports Owners

University of Washington neurosurgeon Rich Ellenbogen was on the sidelines at a Seahawks game last year when he got word that “the boss” wanted to see him.

That would be the top boss, team owner and Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen.

“I’d never met him before,” recalled Ellenbogen, who volunteers as a neurological specialist for the Seahawks and the NFL.

But the UW scientist was thrilled to discover what was on Allen’s mind: concussion and brain injury, and what researchers could do to better understand the problem.

That conversation led to a Seattle-based collaboration launched Thursday — and bankrolled by Allen’s foundation — to study the way blows to the head can damage the brain. Among the questions the scientists hope to answer is whether even mild concussions early in life can lead to dementia decades later.

“I think we can answer some of these questions better than anybody else in the world because of the resources we have,” said Dr. Eric Larson, vice president of research for Group Health, which is involved in the study.

Shrugged off for years as a part of football, repeated concussions have now been linked to permanent brain damage and other neurological problems. Claims by thousands of former players led to a $750 million payout from the NFL earlier this year.

At the same time, the physical and mental fallout from head injuries suffered in Iraq and Afghanistan is taking a toll on a generation of veterans.

(Seattletimes.com)

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31
Jan

Kris Kristofferson Musician/Actor Battles Memory Loss From TBI - Hopes For TBI Recovery

Posted by on in TBI

                                   Kris

Kris Kristofferson says he's lucky to be able to remember his song lyrics nowadays so he can keep performing despite his battle with memory loss.

The 77-year-old country music star told Fox411 he noticed his memory worsening a few years back. Before he rose to fame, Kristofferson excelled in academia, becoming an esteemed Rhodes Scholar and attending Oxford University. But the memory loss, he says, is likely a result of many concussions he suffered long ago.

"They tell me it's from all the football and boxing...But I can remember my songs so I can perform," he said.

(HuffingtonPost.com)

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31
Jan

SuperBowl Seahawks Coach Considers Marijuana as Potential TBI Recovery Agent

Posted by on in TBI

                carroll marijuana medicinal

Pete Carroll wasn't asked about recreational marijuana use though, he was asked his thoughts on the use of medicinal marijuana in the NFL.

"We have to continue to explore and compete to find ways that are going to make our game a better game and take care of our players in the best way possible," Carroll said."The fact that it's in the world of medicine is obviously something [that Commissioner Roger Goodell] realizes and him making the expression that we need to follow the information and the research absolutely I'm in support of. Regardless of what other stigmas may be involved, I think we have to do this because the world of medicine is trying to do the exact same thing and figure it out and they're coming to some conclusions.

"Carroll echoed the comments of Goodell, who said on Jan. 23 that the NFL might consider medicinal marijuana if it there's evidence that it helps treat concussions, "We will obviously follow signs," Goodell said.

(CBS Sports.com)

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