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Adam Reborn: A Family Guide to Surviving a Traumatic Brain Injury

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19
Aug

Eight Years Of TBI Recovery. Never Give Up Hope. Stay Strong. Love Your Family/ Friends Who Support You. TBI Recovery Is Possible.

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_IMG_20160714_132947807.jpg Dear Friends, Tonight is a special night. Another year for TBI Recovery. Eight years ago I suffered my accident....and after three weeks in a coma...I had to re-learn everything. How to walk, talk, eat, dress...reuse my weakened right side. Yet, I decided to not give up on life. I thank you all family and friends who care and view this site...I only want to help others get better. The future continues for me. As always, tonight I will stop by Henry Mayo Hospital ER ward (that initially saved my life) and brings donuts to the staff. I will never forget that they matter. As do all of you. And please remember, TBI recovery is possible...getting back to yourself is possible... but EFFORT is key. Good luck! Adam. Continue reading
Hits: 47
13
Aug

6 Year Old Girl Falls From Ferris Wheel - Suffers TBI

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_greene-county-fair-ferris-wheel.jpg * Dear Friends, many of our little ones love thrill rides. How do we as parents know the ride is safe? Are inspection records posted? Does the attendant look inolved or is he/she bored/asleep/texting? All we as parents can hope for, is that they are professionals in maintaining and caring for their rides. * Inspectors found a mechanical failure caused three children to plummet from a Ferris wheel at a Tennessee county fair, a police spokesman said Tuesday. * Greeneville police Capt. Tim Davis declined to go into specifics about the failure, saying the department is waiting on all the reports from the four inspectors reviewing the carnival ride. * Three girls -- two sisters ages 6 and 10 and an older teenager, 16 -- fell 35 to 40 feet after a basket overturned Monday on a Greene County Fair ride and dumped the occupants. * They were rushed to the Johnson City Medical Center. * Dr. J. Bracken Burns, a surgeon who is the hospital's director of trauma services, told reporters Tuesday the 6-year-old suffered a traumatic brain injury. (Cnn.com) Continue reading
Hits: 48
13
Aug

New NFL Season Brings TBI Concerns From Paul Hornung (Helmets Didn't Protect Players In My Day) TBI Recovery Slim

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_paul-hornung.jpg Former Packers running back and Pro Football Hall of Famer Paul Hornung retired long before concussions were a major topic in the NFL, but, as we’ve learned over the years, not before they took a toll on the players who suffered them. In a lawsuit filed against helmet maker Riddell in Cook County (Illinois) Circuit Court on Thursday, Hornung says that the company failed to properly warn him that the company’s helmets “provided no protection” against concussions and other brain trauma. He is seeking damages of at least $50,000. “Prior to, during and after Paul Hornung’s N.F.L. football career, Riddell knew of the harmful long-term effects of brain traumas sustained by football players while wearing Riddell’s supposed protective equipment; however, it misrepresented and concealed these facts from Paul Hornung,” the complaint said, via the New York Times. (proFootballTalk.com) Continue reading
Hits: 37
28
Jun

Texas Woman Recovers From Jaw Surgery And Wakes Up With "Foreign Accent Syndrome," Rare Type Of TBI Symptom

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_britishflag.jpg *Lisa Alamia was born and raised in Texas, but she speaks with a British accent. KHOU reported that the mother of three began speaking differently six months ago after undergoing jaw surgery to correct an overbite. *“People who don’t know me, they’re like, 'Hey, where are you from?'" Lisa Alamia, of Rosenberg, Tex., told the news station. “I’m from Rosenberg. They’re like, 'Where is that?' I’m like, 'Right here in Rosenberg.' 'Oh, you’re from here? How do you talk like that?' So that’s where the whole story comes up.” *KHOU reported that Alamia was diagnosed with foreign accent syndrome (FAS), a rare neurological disorder that scientists estimate has impacted fewer than 100 people in 100 years. According to researchers at The University of Texas (UT) at Dallas, FAS usually results from stroke or a traumatic injury that damages the brain. FAS may be marked by differences in timing, intonation and tongue placement, but speech remains comprehensible. No cause has been identified for the syndrome, according to UT at Dallas researchers. (FoxNews.com/health) Continue reading
Hits: 173
28
Jun

Your Child's Brain Development Improves With Reading

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_mother-reading-bedtime-stories-to-child.jpg *When parents read to their children the difference shows in children's behavior and academic performance. And according to a new study, the difference also shows in their brain activity. *Researchers looked at children ages 3 to 5 who underwent brain scans called functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while listening to a pre-recorded story. The parents answered questions about how much they read to, and communicated with, their children. *The researchers saw that, when the young children were being told a story, a number of regions in the left part of the brain became active. These are the areas involved in understanding the meaning of words and concepts and also in memory. These same brain regions have been found to be active when older children listen to stories or read. *Even more interesting, according to Horowitz-Kraus, is how the brain activity in this region was higher among the children whose parents reported creating a more literacy-friendly home. "The more you read to your child the more you help the neurons in this region to grow and connect in a way that will benefit the child in the future in reading," she said. (CNN.com/health) Continue reading
Hits: 175
28
Jun

TBI Recovery May Lead To And Create Mystical Experiences

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_Mystical-Experiences.jpg *For Jordan Grafman, it was just a split-second vision. *"About 15 years ago, my mom died," Grafman told Live Science. "I was walking down the street to catch the bus at about 5 a.m., and I looked down the street and saw who I thought was my mom, although my mom had been dead for a week. I looked back, and whatever was there was gone." *That momentary flicker in perception intrigued Grafman, who is a cognitive neuroscientist and the director of brain injury research at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago. *During mystical experiences, people feel connected to a higher power and often describe gaining hidden knowledge or having revelatory insights. *In their new study, the scientists analyzed 116 Vietnam War veterans who experienced brain damage and had mystical experiences, and compared them with 32 combat veterans without brain injuries or neurological disorders. *The researchers found that damage to the frontal and temporal lobes was linked with greater mystical experiences. Previous research found that the frontal lobes, located near the forehead, are linked to movement, problem solving, memory, language and judgment, among other functions. The temporal lobes, located near the bottom of the brain, are linked to the senses, language and memory. (yahoo.com/news) Continue reading
Hits: 174
06
Jun

A Mother's Voice Can Illuminate The Brain

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_motheranddaughter.png * Less than one second. That's how long it takes children to recognize their mother's voice. And that voice lights a child's brain up like a Christmas tree. * A new study from Stanford University School of Medicine studied how children reacted to mom's voice compared to a woman they didn't know. Kids were not only more engaged by mom's voice than a stranger's, scientists found, but this response was noted beyond just auditory areas of the brain. * Parts of the brain related to emotion, reward processing, facial recognition and social functioning are also amped by hearing from mom. In short, a child's ability to communicate socially is in a large way affected by how he or she reacts to mom's voice. * The fact that so many parts of the brain lit up after hearing from mom was the real surprise for scientists, said Vinod Menon, a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and the study's senior author. * This reaction to dear old mom's voice may stretch beyond childhood. A study back in 2010 suggested that teenagers going through a stressful time were almost instantly soothed by hearing mom's voice on the phone, because the conversation helped reduce a key stress hormone and released oxytocin, a feel-good brain chemical believed to play a role in forming bonds. (CNN.com/health) Continue reading
Hits: 225
23
May

Bad Dancer? Yikes! Could Be Your Brain's Fault.

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_Dancers-Cartoon.jpg - A study, released today by researchers at the University of Oxford in England, claims a tiny messenger in the brain is partly to blame for those among us who struggle to grasp the latest dance moves. - This is all about GABA (short for gamma-aminobutyric acid). Again: not Gaga, GABA. A naturally occurring chemical, GABA is a bit like the brain’s traffic cop. Nerve cells in the brain are constantly firing and “talking” to each other. GABA helps keep all that chatter from getting out of control. - “Our research suggests that an important first step in learning that new skill is a decrease in GABA levels in the motor cortex,” explained Dr. Charlotte Stagg, a junior research fellow at Oxford and at John Radcliffe Hospital. Her study was published online in the journal Current Biology. - “It appears that GABA levels in some people are more easily modulated than in others, and that the differences between people (are) related to their ability to learn” new movements, Stagg said. (NBCnews.com as of 2011) Continue reading
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23
May

How Workouts Give Your Brain A Boost And Help TBI Recovery

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_brain-health.jpg - "What benefits the body benefits the brain," says Dianna Purvis Jaffin, PhD, director of strategy and program at the Center for Brain Health's Brain Performance Institute. "You are not a separate brain walking around on top of a body." - Exercise revs up complex processes inside your mind that can curb depression, help you keep your cool at work, and even one day give Betty White a run for her money. Here are three brain benefits of exercise, plus a look at the science behind them from the inside out. - Inside your head, there are about 86 billion neurons designed to bark orders to the rest of your body — all with the help of chemical messengers called neurotransmitters. These neurotransmitters regulate everything from your mood and sleep cycle, to memory and appetite. - What's it to you? Studies show that low levels of two of these neurotransmitters in particular, glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), can lead to mood disorders such as depression. The good news: moderate exercise can increase these levels, according to a recent study in The Journal of Neuroscience. The result, whether you suffer from depression or not, is an increased resilience and capacity to respond to mental challenges, a concept known as "mental fitness," explains study author Richard Maddock, MD, a research professor at UC Davis Medical Center. - If you're constantly feeling overwhelmed by the stressors in your life, you might want to step up your fitness routine. Why? When you're stressed out your brain secretes the "fight or flight" stress hormone cortisol. This is good if you're about to get mugged on the street, but if your cortisol levels are chronically elevated, it can cause problems, says Jaffin. (Studies have linked high cortisol levels to heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, memory loss and more.) - It's never too early to think about having a healthy brain as you age, and exercise can help by increasing your cognitive reserve. Translation: Your brain will be able to handle the deterioration that comes with age without taking its toll on your memory, says Jaffin. (CNN.com/health) Continue reading
Hits: 255
29
Apr

Did TBI Lead To Murder? Could TBI Recovery Have Helped Prevent It?

Posted by on in TBI
(Dear Friends, if a loved one exhibits any violent nature towards you, contact professionals/authorities immediately. In cases such as this, perhaps nuero-counseling or a change in medications may help. Alex.) --- b2ap3_thumbnail_stacy-fawcett.jpg * Investigators are trying to determine what led a Texas teenager to fatally stab his brother and his television-personality mother before mortally wounding himself, police said Monday. * Police in the Dallas suburb of Plano said 19-year old McCann Utu Jr. attacked his 45-year-old mother, Stacy Fawcett, and his 17-year-old brother early Friday before stabbing himself multiple times at the family's home. Authorities said he called 911 at some point and admitted to the killings. * Tilley said investigators are conducting interviews with family and friends who say Utu's disposition dramatically changed after he suffered a concussion during a high school basketball game in the fall of 2013, and then another concussion a few months later during an altercation with another student. * Utu's uncle, Scott Fawcett, said his nephew's mood took a dramatic turn about a year ago, and that he was receiving psychiatric care and concussion therapy. * "He had just completely mentally dwindled away," Fawcett told Dallas TV station WFAA, where Stacy Fawcett provided weekly segments on her favorite dishes and other food-related coverage. * Sarah Stoddard, an assistant professor in the University of Michigan's School of Public Health, said an eight-year study she was involved in indicated that young people who suffered a brain injury were more likely to engage in violent behavior. Stoddard, who isn't involved in the Utu investigation, said personality changes can result from damage to the brain's frontal lobe. * Fawcett’s brother Justin Fawcett told WFAA that McCann Utu went on a rampage — taking knives from the kitchen and stabbing his mom and brother, a senior at Plano West High School. * Waseem Limbada, a friend of McCann Utu, told WFAA on Friday that his friend changed after suffering a concussion in the fall of 2013 while playing for the Plano West basketball team. He said Utu never played again because he couldn’t pass the concussion protocol test. * “When he kept failing it, he had a lot of free time on his hands, he wasn’t showing up to practice,” Limbada said. “It just put him with the wrong crowd, started doing drugs, started being with the wrong people.” (UK DailyMail.com & DallasStarTelegram.com) Continue reading
Hits: 343
15
Mar

The Human Brain Versus A Computer (Who Wins?)

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_brain-versus-computer.jpg * For as fast and powerful as computers have become, they still pose no match for the human brain. Sure, a computer specifically programmed to perform singular task such as, say, playing chess can give a human a run for his or her money, but when we measure a computer against the entirety of what a human mind is capable of, it’s not really all that close. * Over the past few years, scientists, in a variety of ways, have tried to get a super computer to mimic the complexity and raw processing power of the human brain. According to biologists, the human brain has approximately 90 billion nerve cells which are linked together by, quite literally, trillions of connections called synapses. Taken together, this system of elaborate connections within the brain provides “hundreds of trillions of different pathways that brain signals travel through.” * In an effort to mimic this digitally, scientists a few years ago needed more than 82,000 processors running on one of the world’s fastest supercomputers to mimic just 1 second of a normal human’s brain activity. * More recently, a research study found that the human brain can hold 10 times as much information as previously thought. All told, scientists now believe that the capacity of the human brain is about a petabyte. * (Petabyte = almost as much information as the World Wide Web!) (Yahoo.com/Tech) Continue reading
Hits: 427
15
Mar

Hopes and Prayers for TBI Recovery. 4 Year Old Suffers Brain Damage After Dentist Visit.

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_Dentist-tools.jpg * A Texas family is preparing a lawsuit against a local dentist after they say their child suffered brain damage from multiple seizures during the visit. Attorneys say the seizures were brought on by the use of several sedatives while the child was held in a sometimes controversial restraint device. * "In essence what happened is this child was chemically and physically suffocated," said Jim Moriarty, the attorney for the family of 4-year-old Nevaeh Hall. "This child suffered massive brain damage during that time period and that didn't have to happen." * Nevaeh was a repeat patient at Diamond Dental in Houston. Her mother, Courissa Clark, says it was her third visit and that she expected some of the girl's teeth to be capped or even removed because of tooth decay. * Clark says she and her husband were told to stay in the waiting room. * Records reviewed by an independent dentist show that Navaeh was given multiple sedatives: "Sedated in the office for over seven hours, given five sedatives for a routine dental procedure that should have been done and over by mid morning." * The child had been placed in a commonly-used restraint device called a papoose. The device confines the child's arms and legs so they can't interfere with the dental procedure. * According to the review, "Her body tried to compensate for her inability to breathe by increasing her heart rate to as high as 195 beats per minute." Her blood pressure rose to "a dangerous 168/77." And her oxygen saturation dropped as low as 49 percent. "Severe hypoxia is often classified as any saturation lower than 86 percent. And is known to cause brain damage." * "If parents are being told to authorize or grant permission to papoose their child, they probably ought to run," said Craig Jacobs with Children First Dental. (Central Ohio's News Leader/CBS.com) Continue reading
Hits: 410
03
Mar

WWE Superstar Kevin Nash Says "I Will Donate My Brain To CTE Research." TBI Recovery May Benefit From This.

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_kevin-nash-diesel-wwe-legend.jpg *WWE Hall of Famer Kevin Nash announced on Wednesday that he will donate his brain to the CTE Center at Boston University and the Concussion Legacy Foundation after his death, according to a report by ESPN’s Michael Rothstein. *Nash told ESPN that he has had “several concussions” throughout his life so far, and he added that he has had short-term memory issues. “I’ve woken up in the ring and like said to myself, ‘Why am I in this building full of people,'” Nash said. *He also said that this decision was already made five or six years ago. Before his wrestling career, Nash played basketball at Tennessee and overseas in addition to serving in the Army. He told ESPN that he doesn’t blame anyone for the brain damage that he has suffered. (USAtoday.com) Continue reading
Hits: 439
03
Mar

Ivy League Schools Decide To Eliminate Tackling From Football Practices

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_Yale-and-Harvord.jpg *Football coaches in the Ivy League unanimously decided last week to remove tackling from regular-season practices, per a Tuesday report by Ken Belson of the New York Times. *They made the decision in an attempt to further limit players' chances of suffering head and brain injuries. *A study done by Ph.D. holder Timothy A. McGuine—a senior scientist at the University of Wisconsin, Madison—showed the elimination of full-contact practices could decrease injuries at lower levels of the sport, per Bert B. Vargas, M.D., of Neurology Reviews. *One of the eight members of the Ivy League, Dartmouth, has been reducing the amount of full-contact practices since 2010, per Belson. Instead of hitting teammates, players hit tackling dummies and a "specially designed 'mobile virtual player' that moves across the field the way a player would." *This is an easy enough equation: The less contact there is in practice, the less likely a player can suffer an injury that can hold him out of actual game time. *However, it does decrease the amount of time players experience the actual speed of play and get to hone their skills in game-like situations, something that could stunt a player's development. It didn't make much sense to radio talk show host John Ziegler: Ivy League banning tackling in practice to promote safety makes as much sense as the military banning use of guns except in combat #Liberals — John Ziegler (@Zigmanfreud) March 1, 2016 (BleacherReport.com) Continue reading
Hits: 413
03
Mar

Science Fiction or Science Fact? Can Lab Developed Mini Brains Help In TBI Recovery?

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_Research-Laboratory.jpg Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health are growing tiny replicas of the human brain to help the study of neurological diseases in a trend many hope could lead to better treatments and even cures for some of the most debilitating illnesses. The Hopkins scientists join a handful of other medical researchers around the country who are culturing so-called "mini-brains" in the lab. It's a relatively new field of scientific inquiry that could revolutionize how new drugs are tested for effectiveness by replacing drug testing on lab animals with testing on human cells. This process could offer more accurate test results and help in the development of new, more effective drugs. The scientists reprogrammed the genes of human skin cells to make them like embryonic stem cells, which have the capacity to develop into any kind of tissue. These stem cells were then nurtured to become brain cells. The researchers presented their work Friday at the American Association for the Advancement of Science conference in Washington, D.C. When fully grown, the three-dimensional mini-brains measure about 350 micrometers, just visible to the human eye, and look like tiny balls. It takes about eight weeks to grow the brain cells into one of these balls. While the versions aren't exact replicas of brains, they are made of the same neurons and cells found in human brains, feature the same structures and act in the same way. (TheBaltimoreSun.com) Continue reading
Hits: 431
15
Jan

PART TWO - CONCUSSION/TBI RECOVERY

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_donald-trump.jpg *"Football's become soft. Football has become soft,” Trump declared. “Football has become soft like our country has become soft.” *"What used to be considered a great tackle; violent head-on. You used to see these tackles, and it was incredible to watch," Trump said. "Now they tackle -- 'Oh, head-on-head collision, 15 yard [penalty]' -- the whole game is all screwed up. You say, 'Wow, what a tackle.' Bing. Flag.” * Without the “violent, head-on” tackles, Trump, 69, said that the game has become “boring.” *“Who the hell wants to watch these crummy games?” the New York real estate mogul asked. “I just want to watch the end.” (ABCNEWS.COM) Continue reading
Hits: 492
15
Jan

PART ONE - CONCUSSION/TBI RECOVERY

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_concussions.jpg “I know we were paid to hurt people,” says Keith McCants, the fourth overall pick in the 1990 draft. “We were paid to give concussions. If we knew that we were killing people, I would have never put on the jersey.” *Keith McCants, the fourth overall pick in the 1990 draft, drove six hours from Tampa to see the movie. When he exited the theater, he retreated to a bench in the lobby. Tear-soaked, the 47-year-old former linebacker hovered over his cane. “This touched my soul,” he said. “It was outstanding, but I can’t process it all, not right now. I watch this movie and I know we were paid to hurt people. We were paid to give concussions. If we knew that we were killing people, I would have never put on the jersey.” *Concussion is based on Jeanne Marie Laskas’s GQ article “Brain Game” from 2009, which painted a picture of the NFL actively undermining Omalu’s findings to protect its business interests. Many of the same issues were also covered in the Mark Fainaru-Wada and Steve Fainaru book League of Denial and subsequent PBS Frontline documentary. What Concussion does best is simplify the degenerative brain disease CTE for the masses. In one scene, Omalu explains how a woodpecker can violently use its head as a battering ram and not suffer injury: its tongue wraps from the back of it mouth, around the skull and through the nostril—a safety belt, if you will, that absorbs the shock and protects the brain. The human brain has no such safety belt. (KNOWCONCUSSION.ORG) Continue reading
Hits: 501
10
Dec

This Holiday Season Help Prevent A TBI From Occuring By Purchasing A Helmet Along With Your Gift

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_bikes-scooters-skateboards.jpg Dear Friends - Bikes, skateboards and scooters may be on the top of many little ones wish list this year. Please remember that falls are the number one cause of TBI. To help protect against one, please don't forget to add a helmet as the first step. Many kids may think helmets aren't "cool" but, adding stickers or a custom paint job will be perfect. Continue reading
Hits: 515
10
Dec

Wishing All Of You A Merry Christmas and Happy Holiday Season

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_snow-covered-lit-tree.jpg Dear Friends, We would like to thank you all for your kind words and support during the year. We wish you a safe and healthy Holiday Season. - The Stelmach Family Continue reading
Hits: 585
12
Nov

Music And Its Affect On The Brain Can Help With TBI Recovery

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_Brain_music-Waves.jpg **Every time you listen to a piece of music, you're actually giving yourself a deep, full-brain workout. Anyone who has heard a song knows that the feeling is unlike any other. Neurological research into music comprehension has glimpsed why that might be. A song starts with your ears and ends with the music resonating in some way through all four of the brain's major lobes, producing reactions throughout the body, evoking emotions and memory. Looking more closely at the pathways music takes through the brain only reveals why it's played such a powerful role in human life for so long. **Music doesn't follow one path through the brain in a fixed way, so although some things happen earlier than others, much of it happens simultaneously. The various structures involved with comprehension are constantly relaying information back and forth to one another and processing disparate information simultaneously in order to build one's understanding and response to music. **Music with groove promotes corticospinal excitability, which causes that irresistible urge to dance. Additionally, music often causes blood to pump into the muscles in our legs, which many believe is what causes people to tap their feet. **Perhaps the strongest reason that people continue to return to music is its effect on memory. Since memories are not stored in the brain in a centralized location but are instead spread throughout neurological pathways, music's ability to activate such large areas of our brain serves as a powerful stimulus for evoking memories. Music's connection to emotion imbues these musical memories with even more significance. In fact, music can be so effective at stimulating memories, it's sometimes used to help patients living with Alzheimer's disease and dementia grasp portions of their former selves.(Mic.com) Continue reading
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