Traumatic Brain Injury Blog

Adam Reborn: A Family Guide to Surviving a Traumatic Brain Injury

  • Home
    Home This is where you can find all the blog posts throughout the site.
  • Login
    Login Login form

TBI

10
Nov

Part 2: NFL TBI Recovery. Brain Scientist Says That He Would Let His Son Play Football

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_brain-doctor-and-son.png My name is Peter Cummings. I am a forensic pathologist and a neuropathologist, which means I study brain trauma for a living. I am also a football coach and I let my 11-year-old son play football. I may be the only neuropathologist on Earth who lets his kid play football. Before I began this journey, football was banned in my house. I wouldn’t even watch it on TV because I didn’t want my son to see it and develop a desire to play. Despite my efforts, he discovered football via a video game. He immediately fell in love with the sport and I was forced to do some serious soul searching: Should I allow him to pursue his interest and play? CTE stands for “chronic traumatic encephalopathy”; in real words it means damage to the brain caused by repetitive injury. The hallmark of CTE is the deposition of a protein called ‘tau’ in the brain. Tau has a number of functions, including stabilizing the structure of nerve cells. When nerves are injured, tau builds up and can cause problems. You may have a read about a recently published paper reporting the presence of CTE in the brains of 99 percent of former National Football League players examined. The findings of this study sent the media into a frenzy and produced a lot of negative press toward football. As a result of the media attention, people are now saying there should be no more youth football; there are even people who are insinuating I am abusing my son by allowing him to play football. So, when you hear “99 percent of football players had CTE,” that doesn’t mean that almost every football player will get CTE, and it doesn’t mean your child has a 99-percent chance of developing CTE if he or she plays football. It means 99 percent of a specifically selected study sample had some degree of CTE; not 99 percent of the general football population. This is an important distinction. (Sports.yahoo.com) Continue reading
Hits: 116
10
Nov

Part 1: NFL TBI Recovery. Bob Costas Says NFL/Football Destroys Brains

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_Bob-costas.jpg As far as longtime sports broadcaster Bob Costas is concerned, the future of football in the United States is clear — and bleak. “The reality is that this game destroys people’s brains," he said Tuesday night. “The cracks in the foundation are there,” Costas said. “The day-to-day issues, as serious as they may be, they may come and go. But you cannot change the nature of the game. I certainly would not let, if I had an athletically gifted 12- or 13-year-old son, I would not let him play football.” Costas said the NFL’s apparent defense mechanism — to seek more information and continue to study the dangers of the sport — will only hurt its own cause. “The more information (that) comes out, the worse it looks,” the 28-time Emmy Award winner said. He added that existing literature and research will eventually lead families to what he called a “common-sense conclusion," that children should not play tackle football until they’re 18, if they play at all. (USAtoday.com) Continue reading
Hits: 107
19
Oct

TBI Recovery Exercises

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_tbi-drive.jpg A brain injury can be devastating, not only with regard to physical disabilities and lack of function, but for memory, speech, cognitive thinking and reasoning processes as well. In some cases, you may be able to restore function and use of damaged areas of the brain through physical, speech or occupational therapy, according to the Brain Injury Recovery Network. Understand the basics of brain injury recovery exercises and what they do, to offer the best rehabilitation and restoration of physical and cognitive function as possible following a brain injury. Range of motion exercises are a type of physical therapy that keeps the joints mobile and functioning. Range of motion exercises can be done by the individual, or with help from physical therapies in a method known as passive range of motion. Engage in a variety of activities and exercises that help rebuild cognitive skills, suggests the University of Alabama Traumatic Brain Injury Model System. Such exercises may focus on writing skills through drawing shapes or copying shapes. Say a list of letters or numbers in a slow, steady tone of voice and ask the person who has suffered the brain injury to make a mark on the paper every time she hears a certain number or letter. Or, say letters of the alphabet or say short words with a certain sound, asking the patient to nod or raise his hand when he hears that sound, suggests the University of Alabama Traumatic Brain Injury Model System. Practice basic neurobics exercises every day, which helps create and develop neural cells and pathways in the brain, according to the Franklin Institute. Neurobics can be performed by literally exercising the brain. For example, instead of brushing your hair with your dominant hand, switch to your non-dominant hand. Such exercises help stimulate and challenge the brain, enhancing plasticity, or formulating new growth and development. (Livestong.com) Continue reading
Hits: 142
19
Oct
19
Aug

9 Years Of TBI Recovery - I Don't Give Up - You Don't Give Up

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_IMG_20160710_170230941.jpg Dear Friends, August 18th is my anniversary for my accident date. Around 11:30PM was when I fell over 40 feet onto concrete and suffered a TBI! Glad that you are supporting me and the site because support from family or friends helps a lot. Tonight I will be going to Henry Mayo's Emergency Room and thanking them. I will bring them a couple boxes of doughnuts which is a good trade for saving my life. Bless you all. Adam Continue reading
Hits: 409

Available Online - Ebook or Paperback

bookcoversidebar

Connect With Us

facebook