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TBI

29
Apr

Did TBI Lead To Murder? Could TBI Recovery Have Helped Prevent It?

Posted by on in TBI
(Dear Friends, if a loved one exhibits any violent nature towards you, contact professionals/authorities immediately. In cases such as this, perhaps nuero-counseling or a change in medications may help. Alex.) --- b2ap3_thumbnail_stacy-fawcett.jpg * Investigators are trying to determine what led a Texas teenager to fatally stab his brother and his television-personality mother before mortally wounding himself, police said Monday. * Police in the Dallas suburb of Plano said 19-year old McCann Utu Jr. attacked his 45-year-old mother, Stacy Fawcett, and his 17-year-old brother early Friday before stabbing himself multiple times at the family's home. Authorities said he called 911 at some point and admitted to the killings. * Tilley said investigators are conducting interviews with family and friends who say Utu's disposition dramatically changed after he suffered a concussion during a high school basketball game in the fall of 2013, and then another concussion a few months later during an altercation with another student. * Utu's uncle, Scott Fawcett, said his nephew's mood took a dramatic turn about a year ago, and that he was receiving psychiatric care and concussion therapy. * "He had just completely mentally dwindled away," Fawcett told Dallas TV station WFAA, where Stacy Fawcett provided weekly segments on her favorite dishes and other food-related coverage. * Sarah Stoddard, an assistant professor in the University of Michigan's School of Public Health, said an eight-year study she was involved in indicated that young people who suffered a brain injury were more likely to engage in violent behavior. Stoddard, who isn't involved in the Utu investigation, said personality changes can result from damage to the brain's frontal lobe. * Fawcett’s brother Justin Fawcett told WFAA that McCann Utu went on a rampage — taking knives from the kitchen and stabbing his mom and brother, a senior at Plano West High School. * Waseem Limbada, a friend of McCann Utu, told WFAA on Friday that his friend changed after suffering a concussion in the fall of 2013 while playing for the Plano West basketball team. He said Utu never played again because he couldn’t pass the concussion protocol test. * “When he kept failing it, he had a lot of free time on his hands, he wasn’t showing up to practice,” Limbada said. “It just put him with the wrong crowd, started doing drugs, started being with the wrong people.” (UK DailyMail.com & DallasStarTelegram.com) Continue reading
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15
Mar

The Human Brain Versus A Computer (Who Wins?)

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_brain-versus-computer.jpg * For as fast and powerful as computers have become, they still pose no match for the human brain. Sure, a computer specifically programmed to perform singular task such as, say, playing chess can give a human a run for his or her money, but when we measure a computer against the entirety of what a human mind is capable of, it’s not really all that close. * Over the past few years, scientists, in a variety of ways, have tried to get a super computer to mimic the complexity and raw processing power of the human brain. According to biologists, the human brain has approximately 90 billion nerve cells which are linked together by, quite literally, trillions of connections called synapses. Taken together, this system of elaborate connections within the brain provides “hundreds of trillions of different pathways that brain signals travel through.” * In an effort to mimic this digitally, scientists a few years ago needed more than 82,000 processors running on one of the world’s fastest supercomputers to mimic just 1 second of a normal human’s brain activity. * More recently, a research study found that the human brain can hold 10 times as much information as previously thought. All told, scientists now believe that the capacity of the human brain is about a petabyte. * (Petabyte = almost as much information as the World Wide Web!) (Yahoo.com/Tech) Continue reading
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15
Mar

Hopes and Prayers for TBI Recovery. 4 Year Old Suffers Brain Damage After Dentist Visit.

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_Dentist-tools.jpg * A Texas family is preparing a lawsuit against a local dentist after they say their child suffered brain damage from multiple seizures during the visit. Attorneys say the seizures were brought on by the use of several sedatives while the child was held in a sometimes controversial restraint device. * "In essence what happened is this child was chemically and physically suffocated," said Jim Moriarty, the attorney for the family of 4-year-old Nevaeh Hall. "This child suffered massive brain damage during that time period and that didn't have to happen." * Nevaeh was a repeat patient at Diamond Dental in Houston. Her mother, Courissa Clark, says it was her third visit and that she expected some of the girl's teeth to be capped or even removed because of tooth decay. * Clark says she and her husband were told to stay in the waiting room. * Records reviewed by an independent dentist show that Navaeh was given multiple sedatives: "Sedated in the office for over seven hours, given five sedatives for a routine dental procedure that should have been done and over by mid morning." * The child had been placed in a commonly-used restraint device called a papoose. The device confines the child's arms and legs so they can't interfere with the dental procedure. * According to the review, "Her body tried to compensate for her inability to breathe by increasing her heart rate to as high as 195 beats per minute." Her blood pressure rose to "a dangerous 168/77." And her oxygen saturation dropped as low as 49 percent. "Severe hypoxia is often classified as any saturation lower than 86 percent. And is known to cause brain damage." * "If parents are being told to authorize or grant permission to papoose their child, they probably ought to run," said Craig Jacobs with Children First Dental. (Central Ohio's News Leader/CBS.com) Continue reading
Hits: 950
03
Mar

WWE Superstar Kevin Nash Says "I Will Donate My Brain To CTE Research." TBI Recovery May Benefit From This.

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_kevin-nash-diesel-wwe-legend.jpg *WWE Hall of Famer Kevin Nash announced on Wednesday that he will donate his brain to the CTE Center at Boston University and the Concussion Legacy Foundation after his death, according to a report by ESPN’s Michael Rothstein. *Nash told ESPN that he has had “several concussions” throughout his life so far, and he added that he has had short-term memory issues. “I’ve woken up in the ring and like said to myself, ‘Why am I in this building full of people,'” Nash said. *He also said that this decision was already made five or six years ago. Before his wrestling career, Nash played basketball at Tennessee and overseas in addition to serving in the Army. He told ESPN that he doesn’t blame anyone for the brain damage that he has suffered. (USAtoday.com) Continue reading
Hits: 964
03
Mar

Ivy League Schools Decide To Eliminate Tackling From Football Practices

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_Yale-and-Harvord.jpg *Football coaches in the Ivy League unanimously decided last week to remove tackling from regular-season practices, per a Tuesday report by Ken Belson of the New York Times. *They made the decision in an attempt to further limit players' chances of suffering head and brain injuries. *A study done by Ph.D. holder Timothy A. McGuine—a senior scientist at the University of Wisconsin, Madison—showed the elimination of full-contact practices could decrease injuries at lower levels of the sport, per Bert B. Vargas, M.D., of Neurology Reviews. *One of the eight members of the Ivy League, Dartmouth, has been reducing the amount of full-contact practices since 2010, per Belson. Instead of hitting teammates, players hit tackling dummies and a "specially designed 'mobile virtual player' that moves across the field the way a player would." *This is an easy enough equation: The less contact there is in practice, the less likely a player can suffer an injury that can hold him out of actual game time. *However, it does decrease the amount of time players experience the actual speed of play and get to hone their skills in game-like situations, something that could stunt a player's development. It didn't make much sense to radio talk show host John Ziegler: Ivy League banning tackling in practice to promote safety makes as much sense as the military banning use of guns except in combat #Liberals — John Ziegler (@Zigmanfreud) March 1, 2016 (BleacherReport.com) Continue reading
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