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TBI

11
Aug

2017 NFL Season About To Start. Hope For A New Football Helmet To Prevent TBI.

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_vicis-zero1-helmet.jpg * Football is a game of inches, and none is more important than the inch and a half between the outside shell of a helmet and a player’s skull. Since the 1940s, when hard plastic helmets began to replace leather ones, the primary purpose of the helmet has been to guard against skull fractures and hematomas (bleeding on the brain)—catastrophic injuries that led to deaths on the football field in the early 1900s. In recent years, however, scientific studies have led to a better understanding of the short- and long-term consequences of blows to the head. * In 2015, the number of diagnosed concussions, in both preseason and regular-season practices and games, totaled 271. And the number diagnosed in regular-season games (182) was up 58 percent from 2014—and 18% over the four-year average. They all realized the issue of head trauma was not going away, and they wondered: What more could be done with helmets? * Though the medical community understands the nature of concussions better than ever, the injury remains something of a riddle for doctors and scientists, because it presents in different ways for different people. One long-held theory was that the brain sloshes back and forth during a collision, striking the rough inner surface of the skull and rebounding against the opposite side—a violent act that causes bruising and swelling. * VICIS’ design literally turns the traditional hard polycarbonate helmet that’s been used for decades inside out. A stiff plastic shell inside still protects against skull fractures, but it’s the first helmet to have an outside surface made of a flexible polymer that deforms locally upon impact, rather than making that familiar crack sound. The concept is the same as that of a bumper on a car: The material bends, thereby slowing down the impact and reducing the force transferred to the person inside, according to Newton’s Second Law of Motion (force=mass x acceleration). The outer and inner layers are connected by a matrix of columns that flex in all directions to absorb linear, and most importantly, rotational forces. (SI.com) Continue reading
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12
Jun

Brain Facts

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_plugged-in-brain.jpg 1. The human brain, weighs only about 3lbs. (around 1.5 kg.), makes up just 2% of the body weight and uses around 20% of the body’s oxygen and blood. 75% of the total brain mass is water. 2. It is the fattest organ in the body, contains 100 billion neurons or nerve cells (15 times the total human population on earth) and a trillion glial cells and has around 150,000 miles of blood vessels. 3. The brain processes information as slow as 0.5m/sec to as fast as 120m/sec. The brain can survive without oxygen for 4-6 minutes after which it begins to die. Lack of oxygen for 5-10 minutes can lead to permanent brain damage. 4. Physical exercise is just as important for the brain as it is for the rest of the body. In a recent study published in the annals of internal medicine suggest that exercise can delay the age at which people may get Alzheimer’s disease by more than 30% as it improves and makes more regular the blood flow to the brain. 5. Music triggers activity in the same part of the brain that releases the ‘pleasure chemical’ dopamine during sex and eating. 6. Everyone dreams, even blind people, for at least 1-2 hours and on an average 4-7 dreams each night. Brain waves are more active while you are dreaming than when you are awake. 7. It is a myth that we use only 10% of the brain, in fact every part of the brain has a known function. Also, there is no left/right brain divide-they work together. And No, brain cells do not die whenever you sneeze. (ExaminedExistence.com) Continue reading
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12
Jun

Who Has A Faster TBI Recovery - Men or Women?

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_symbols.jpg ***Female TBI patients recover better than males*** * The purpose of the present study was to look at possible gender differences in outcome after severe traumatic brain injury. Three hundred and thirty four consecutive patients, 72 females and 262 males, age range 5-65 years, were included in the study. Age range and severity of injury, evaluated by duration of unconsciousness, did not differ between male and female patients. Predicted outcome at the time of discharge from an in patient rehabilitation programme was evaluated according to work capacity. Female TBI patients had a better predicted outcome (p < 0.015). It is suggested that pro gesterone, acting as a neuroprotective agent, may explain this difference in outcome. * Why do some females recover from brain injury much faster and more completely than males?1 With more than 3 million people chronically disabled from traumatic brain injury, the answer may have far-reaching implications for the treatment of traumatic brain injury, stroke, and other neurological disorders. * For the past twenty-five years, neuroscientist Donald G. Stein, PhD and his colleagues have been investigating this question and have discovered something remarkable—that the hormone progesterone confers profound neuroprotective effects that improve outcomes and reduce mortality following brain injuries. * Progesterone provides powerful neuroprotection to the fetus, particularly in late pregnancy, when it helps suppress neuronal excitation that can damage delicate new brain tissue. Dr. Stein and his colleagues at Emory University in Atlanta have continued to develop, test, and prove the theory that in addition to protecting the fetal brain, progesterone also protects and heals injured brain tissue. (NCBI & Lifeextension.com) Continue reading
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09
May

TBI Recovery. Treatment For Concussions

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_ConcussionRRR.jpg **The most common and least serious type of traumatic brain injury is called a concussion. The word comes from the Latin concutere, which means "to shake violently." **As seen in countless Saturday morning cartoons, a concussion is most often caused by a sudden direct blow or bump to the head. The brain is made of soft tissue. It's cushioned by spinal fluid and encased in the protective shell of the skull. When you sustain a concussion, the impact can jolt your brain. Sometimes, it literally causes it to move around in your head. Traumatic brain injuries can cause bruising, damage to the blood vessels, and injury to the nerves. **If a child has a concussion, an adult should monitor him or her for the first 24 hours. It's important to watch for behavioral changes. Young children, especially, may not be able to fully communicate what they are feeling, so it is critical to watch them closely. Do not give medications, including aspirin, which may cause bleeding, to a child without consulting a doctor. **Concussions are graded as mild (grade 1), moderate (grade 2), or severe (grade 3), depending on such factors as loss of consciousness, amnesia, and loss of equilibrium. **Seek medical attention. A health care professional can decide how serious the concussion is and whether you require treatment. If you have suffered a grade 1 or grade 2 concussion, wait until symptoms are gone before returning to normal activities. That could take several minutes, hours, days, or even a week. **If you have sustained a grade 3 concussion, see a doctor immediately for observation and treatment. (WebMD.com) Continue reading
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09
May

Wars May Be Ending, However, TBI Recovery Is Still Needed

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_military-tbi.jpg **Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant health issue which affects service members and veterans during times of both peace and war. The high rate of TBI and blast-related concussion events resulting from current combat operations directly impacts the health and safety of individual service members and subsequently the level of unit readiness and troop retention. The impacts of TBI are felt within each branch of the service and throughout both the Department of Defense (DoD) and the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health care systems. **Veterans may sustain TBIs throughout their lifespan, with the largest increase as the veterans enter into their 70s and 80s; these injuries are often caused by falls and result in high levels of disability. **Active duty and reserve service members are at increased risk for sustaining a TBI compared to their civilian peers. This is a result of several factors, including the specific demographics of the military; in general, young men between the ages of 18 to 24 are at greatest risk for TBI. Many operational and training activities, which are routine in the military, are physically demanding and even potentially dangerous. (DVBIC.com) Continue reading
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