Traumatic Brain Injury Blog

Adam Reborn: A Family Guide to Surviving a Traumatic Brain Injury

  • Home
    Home This is where you can find all the blog posts throughout the site.
  • Login
    Login Login form

TBI

19
Oct

TBI Recovery Exercises

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_tbi-drive.jpg A brain injury can be devastating, not only with regard to physical disabilities and lack of function, but for memory, speech, cognitive thinking and reasoning processes as well. In some cases, you may be able to restore function and use of damaged areas of the brain through physical, speech or occupational therapy, according to the Brain Injury Recovery Network. Understand the basics of brain injury recovery exercises and what they do, to offer the best rehabilitation and restoration of physical and cognitive function as possible following a brain injury. Range of motion exercises are a type of physical therapy that keeps the joints mobile and functioning. Range of motion exercises can be done by the individual, or with help from physical therapies in a method known as passive range of motion. Engage in a variety of activities and exercises that help rebuild cognitive skills, suggests the University of Alabama Traumatic Brain Injury Model System. Such exercises may focus on writing skills through drawing shapes or copying shapes. Say a list of letters or numbers in a slow, steady tone of voice and ask the person who has suffered the brain injury to make a mark on the paper every time she hears a certain number or letter. Or, say letters of the alphabet or say short words with a certain sound, asking the patient to nod or raise his hand when he hears that sound, suggests the University of Alabama Traumatic Brain Injury Model System. Practice basic neurobics exercises every day, which helps create and develop neural cells and pathways in the brain, according to the Franklin Institute. Neurobics can be performed by literally exercising the brain. For example, instead of brushing your hair with your dominant hand, switch to your non-dominant hand. Such exercises help stimulate and challenge the brain, enhancing plasticity, or formulating new growth and development. (Livestong.com) Continue reading
Hits: 430
19
Oct
19
Aug

9 Years Of TBI Recovery - I Don't Give Up - You Don't Give Up

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_IMG_20160710_170230941.jpg Dear Friends, August 18th is my anniversary for my accident date. Around 11:30PM was when I fell over 40 feet onto concrete and suffered a TBI! Glad that you are supporting me and the site because support from family or friends helps a lot. Tonight I will be going to Henry Mayo's Emergency Room and thanking them. I will bring them a couple boxes of doughnuts which is a good trade for saving my life. Bless you all. Adam Continue reading
Hits: 689
11
Aug

Michael Oher - "Blind Side" Movie Star/NFL Star Struggles With TBI Recovery

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_brain-pills.jpg * The Carolina Panthers have terminated offensive tackle Michael Oher’s contract, the team announced Thursday in a news release. * Oher started the first three games of the 2016 season before a concussion caused him to be inactive for the next seven games and placed on injured reserve. * Oher tweeted Thursday afternoon, “The Brain is a scary thing. You have to be careful with it.” * Oher apparently is taking a lot of prescription pills and medication to help him during his recovery. Oher posted - and deleted - a picture of multiple pill bottles with a caption that said "All for the brain smh." (myFox8.com) Continue reading
Hits: 691
11
Aug

Girls and TBI Recovery

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_Soccer-concussions.jpg * Girls who suffer traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) may be more susceptible to behavioral problems like psychological distress and smoking compared to boys, according to a new study. * Each year, TBIs cause 2.5 million emergency room visits, and so far research has consistently shown that they're more common among boys than girls. Girls still get them, though, and often in sports like soccer, basketball and cheerleading. A new study published in the journal PLOS ONE that surveyed 9,288 Ontario students in grades 7 through 12 reports that girls who suffered brain injuries—in sports, most commonly—were more likely to report having contemplated suicide, experienced psychological distress, been the target of bullying and having smoked cigarettes. * Overall, the new study reports that one in five adolescents had sustained a TBI that resulted in their loss of consciousness for at least five minutes or hospitalization at some point in their lifetime. Boys experienced them 6% more than girls. These young people who had experienced a lifetime TBI also reported behaviors in the last year like daily smoking, binge drinking, using marijuana, cyberbullying and poor grades. * Girls get TBIs most often playing soccer and basketball, but other sports—cheerleading, in particular—have very high risk for injuries. The American Academy of Pediatrics has called for more safety regulations for the cheerleading, even though it tends to not be included in national high school sports injury research. (Time.com) Continue reading
Hits: 712

Available Online - Ebook or Paperback

bookcoversidebar

Connect With Us

facebook