Traumatic Brain Injury Blog

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TBI

09
May

TBI Recovery. Treatment For Concussions

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_ConcussionRRR.jpg **The most common and least serious type of traumatic brain injury is called a concussion. The word comes from the Latin concutere, which means "to shake violently." **As seen in countless Saturday morning cartoons, a concussion is most often caused by a sudden direct blow or bump to the head. The brain is made of soft tissue. It's cushioned by spinal fluid and encased in the protective shell of the skull. When you sustain a concussion, the impact can jolt your brain. Sometimes, it literally causes it to move around in your head. Traumatic brain injuries can cause bruising, damage to the blood vessels, and injury to the nerves. **If a child has a concussion, an adult should monitor him or her for the first 24 hours. It's important to watch for behavioral changes. Young children, especially, may not be able to fully communicate what they are feeling, so it is critical to watch them closely. Do not give medications, including aspirin, which may cause bleeding, to a child without consulting a doctor. **Concussions are graded as mild (grade 1), moderate (grade 2), or severe (grade 3), depending on such factors as loss of consciousness, amnesia, and loss of equilibrium. **Seek medical attention. A health care professional can decide how serious the concussion is and whether you require treatment. If you have suffered a grade 1 or grade 2 concussion, wait until symptoms are gone before returning to normal activities. That could take several minutes, hours, days, or even a week. **If you have sustained a grade 3 concussion, see a doctor immediately for observation and treatment. (WebMD.com) Continue reading
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09
May

Wars May Be Ending, However, TBI Recovery Is Still Needed

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_military-tbi.jpg **Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant health issue which affects service members and veterans during times of both peace and war. The high rate of TBI and blast-related concussion events resulting from current combat operations directly impacts the health and safety of individual service members and subsequently the level of unit readiness and troop retention. The impacts of TBI are felt within each branch of the service and throughout both the Department of Defense (DoD) and the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health care systems. **Veterans may sustain TBIs throughout their lifespan, with the largest increase as the veterans enter into their 70s and 80s; these injuries are often caused by falls and result in high levels of disability. **Active duty and reserve service members are at increased risk for sustaining a TBI compared to their civilian peers. This is a result of several factors, including the specific demographics of the military; in general, young men between the ages of 18 to 24 are at greatest risk for TBI. Many operational and training activities, which are routine in the military, are physically demanding and even potentially dangerous. (DVBIC.com) Continue reading
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08
Apr

Common TBI Symptoms

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_traumetic-brain-injury.jpg * TBI symptoms vary depending on the extent of the injury and the area of the brain affected. Some symptoms appear immediately; others may appear several days or even weeks later. A person with TBI may or may not lose consciousness—loss of consciousness is not always a sign of severe TBI. * A person with a mild TBI may experience: Headache. Confusion. Lightheadedness. Dizziness. Blurred vision. * A person with moderate or severe TBI may have some of the symptoms listed above. In addition, the person may experience any of the following: Headache that gets worse or won’t go away. Repeated vomiting or nausea. Slurred speech. Convulsions or seizures. An inability to wake up from sleep. (Nih.gov) Continue reading
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26
Jan

Diabetes Can Affect Your Brain

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_Brain-Damage.png Diabetes can have an impact on your whole body. Your brain is no exception. Recent studies have linked type 2 diabetes to a slowdown in mental functioning and an increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease. The chance of brain complications is just one more reason to keep your diabetes under control. “High blood sugar may directly affect either nerve cells or support cells in the nervous system,” says Alan Jacobson, M.D., emeritus professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. “It can also lead to damage in both large and small blood vessels.” This, in turn, reduces the amount of oxygen reaching the brain. Plus, it increases the risk of having a stroke, which can kill brain cells. Research has linked type 2 diabetes to a decline in mental functioning. One study looked at which mental abilities were hardest hit in middle-aged and older adults with diabetes. The results pointed to neurocognitive speed and executive functioning. “These are thought to be major components of cognitive health,” says researcher Roger Dixon, Ph.D., a psychology professor at the University of Alberta. (HealthGrades.com) Continue reading
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26
Jan

As the Super Bowl Approaches, Inspiring Football Stories Abound

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_felicia-perez.jpg Every family involved in sports know the joys and danger of playing football. (TBI is ever present.) However, Felicia Perez has a different attitude. Felicia Perez didn’t suffer any injuries while playing football for Brandywine High School last season. Unless you consider broken fingers to be injuries, which she does not. That fearless attitude and a ceaseless work ethic have made this 4-foot-8 battering ram willing to smash her nose into any situation a hit with the Bulldogs. “Felicia is tough as nails,” Brandywine head coach Isaiah Mays said last week. “The best way to describe it is she would much rather be the hammer than the nail. She definitely works hard every day, and she has no quit in her.” Delaware has seen several girls play high school football over the last few years, but most have been kickers or safeties. Perez is a middle linebacker and fullback, which puts her in the pileup every time she's on the field. She wouldn’t want to be anywhere else. “I like to be the dominant person,” Perez said. “Other females follow other females. I’m not a follower. I’m a leader. So I decided I was going to play a predominantly male sport.” (USAtoday.com) Continue reading
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