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Adam Reborn: A Family Guide to Surviving a Traumatic Brain Injury

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28
Jan

Recreational Therapy Can Help With TBI Recovery

Posted by on in TBI
TBI Recovery can be a long and hard process. However, playing games can make TBI recovery more fun and help stimulate the brain. One easy, fast moving game that our family has rediscovered is "5 Second Rule." For instance, in 5 seconds "Name 3 states that begin with the letter C."b2ap3_thumbnail_5-second-game.jpg Continue reading
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28
Jan

Penn State Fraternity Hazing Leads To Fatal TBI - No Recovery

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_timothy-piazza.jpg Eighteen Penn State fraternity brothers have been charged with crimes ranging up to involuntary manslaughter in the case of a pledge who authorities say repeatedly fell down a flight of stairs after he and others were made to run a gantlet of drinking stations where they guzzled vodka, beer and wine. Fraternity members at Beta Theta Pi resisted getting help for 19-year-old Timothy Piazza, causing him to suffer for hours and possibly making his injuries worse, a prosecutor said Friday in announcing the results of a grand jury investigation. The grand jury, aided by security camera footage, said the fraternity was heavily stocked with booze for the Feb. 2 ceremony at which Piazza, a sophomore engineering student from Lebanon, New Jersey, and 13 others accepted pledge bids. The pledges were pressured to chug vodka, shotgun beers and drink wine at different stations. Piazza tumbled down a long flight of stairs that night and fell several other times, injuring his head, Miller said. The next morning, he fell down the same steps and was unconscious when help was finally summoned. Piazza died Feb. 4 as a result of a traumatic brain injury.(witf.org/news) Continue reading
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28
Jan
29
Dec

Thank You All For Your Continuing Support For TBI Recovery

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_sea-sunrise.jpg Dear Friends, may your New Year be a peaceful one. Our site is a small one, however, our intent is huge. A TBI can occur at any moment of our lives. "Adam Reborn," wants to be there to inform and inspire people towards the pathways of TBI Recovery. Your support keeps our hopes moving forward. Bless you all, Alex Continue reading
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22
Nov

TBI Recovery Leads To Happy Thanksgiving Wishes And A New Job Helping the Community

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_IMG_20160714_132907943_HDR.jpg Dear Friends, I just got a job from Indelife, as a Disability Trainer, that helps out people with developmental disabilities. I was SO happy getting this job because it is exactly what I want to do. I get to help out other people and make their lives easier for them to re-establish themselves back into the community. Thanks for all your support and have a wonderful Thanksgiving. -- Adam Continue reading
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10
Nov

Part 2: NFL TBI Recovery. Brain Scientist Says That He Would Let His Son Play Football

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_brain-doctor-and-son.png My name is Peter Cummings. I am a forensic pathologist and a neuropathologist, which means I study brain trauma for a living. I am also a football coach and I let my 11-year-old son play football. I may be the only neuropathologist on Earth who lets his kid play football. Before I began this journey, football was banned in my house. I wouldn’t even watch it on TV because I didn’t want my son to see it and develop a desire to play. Despite my efforts, he discovered football via a video game. He immediately fell in love with the sport and I was forced to do some serious soul searching: Should I allow him to pursue his interest and play? CTE stands for “chronic traumatic encephalopathy”; in real words it means damage to the brain caused by repetitive injury. The hallmark of CTE is the deposition of a protein called ‘tau’ in the brain. Tau has a number of functions, including stabilizing the structure of nerve cells. When nerves are injured, tau builds up and can cause problems. You may have a read about a recently published paper reporting the presence of CTE in the brains of 99 percent of former National Football League players examined. The findings of this study sent the media into a frenzy and produced a lot of negative press toward football. As a result of the media attention, people are now saying there should be no more youth football; there are even people who are insinuating I am abusing my son by allowing him to play football. So, when you hear “99 percent of football players had CTE,” that doesn’t mean that almost every football player will get CTE, and it doesn’t mean your child has a 99-percent chance of developing CTE if he or she plays football. It means 99 percent of a specifically selected study sample had some degree of CTE; not 99 percent of the general football population. This is an important distinction. (Sports.yahoo.com) Continue reading
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10
Nov

Part 1: NFL TBI Recovery. Bob Costas Says NFL/Football Destroys Brains

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_Bob-costas.jpg As far as longtime sports broadcaster Bob Costas is concerned, the future of football in the United States is clear — and bleak. “The reality is that this game destroys people’s brains," he said Tuesday night. “The cracks in the foundation are there,” Costas said. “The day-to-day issues, as serious as they may be, they may come and go. But you cannot change the nature of the game. I certainly would not let, if I had an athletically gifted 12- or 13-year-old son, I would not let him play football.” Costas said the NFL’s apparent defense mechanism — to seek more information and continue to study the dangers of the sport — will only hurt its own cause. “The more information (that) comes out, the worse it looks,” the 28-time Emmy Award winner said. He added that existing literature and research will eventually lead families to what he called a “common-sense conclusion," that children should not play tackle football until they’re 18, if they play at all. (USAtoday.com) Continue reading
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19
Oct

TBI Recovery Exercises

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_tbi-drive.jpg A brain injury can be devastating, not only with regard to physical disabilities and lack of function, but for memory, speech, cognitive thinking and reasoning processes as well. In some cases, you may be able to restore function and use of damaged areas of the brain through physical, speech or occupational therapy, according to the Brain Injury Recovery Network. Understand the basics of brain injury recovery exercises and what they do, to offer the best rehabilitation and restoration of physical and cognitive function as possible following a brain injury. Range of motion exercises are a type of physical therapy that keeps the joints mobile and functioning. Range of motion exercises can be done by the individual, or with help from physical therapies in a method known as passive range of motion. Engage in a variety of activities and exercises that help rebuild cognitive skills, suggests the University of Alabama Traumatic Brain Injury Model System. Such exercises may focus on writing skills through drawing shapes or copying shapes. Say a list of letters or numbers in a slow, steady tone of voice and ask the person who has suffered the brain injury to make a mark on the paper every time she hears a certain number or letter. Or, say letters of the alphabet or say short words with a certain sound, asking the patient to nod or raise his hand when he hears that sound, suggests the University of Alabama Traumatic Brain Injury Model System. Practice basic neurobics exercises every day, which helps create and develop neural cells and pathways in the brain, according to the Franklin Institute. Neurobics can be performed by literally exercising the brain. For example, instead of brushing your hair with your dominant hand, switch to your non-dominant hand. Such exercises help stimulate and challenge the brain, enhancing plasticity, or formulating new growth and development. (Livestong.com) Continue reading
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19
Oct
19
Aug

9 Years Of TBI Recovery - I Don't Give Up - You Don't Give Up

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_IMG_20160710_170230941.jpg Dear Friends, August 18th is my anniversary for my accident date. Around 11:30PM was when I fell over 40 feet onto concrete and suffered a TBI! Glad that you are supporting me and the site because support from family or friends helps a lot. Tonight I will be going to Henry Mayo's Emergency Room and thanking them. I will bring them a couple boxes of doughnuts which is a good trade for saving my life. Bless you all. Adam Continue reading
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11
Aug

Michael Oher - "Blind Side" Movie Star/NFL Star Struggles With TBI Recovery

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_brain-pills.jpg * The Carolina Panthers have terminated offensive tackle Michael Oher’s contract, the team announced Thursday in a news release. * Oher started the first three games of the 2016 season before a concussion caused him to be inactive for the next seven games and placed on injured reserve. * Oher tweeted Thursday afternoon, “The Brain is a scary thing. You have to be careful with it.” * Oher apparently is taking a lot of prescription pills and medication to help him during his recovery. Oher posted - and deleted - a picture of multiple pill bottles with a caption that said "All for the brain smh." (myFox8.com) Continue reading
Hits: 418
11
Aug

Girls and TBI Recovery

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_Soccer-concussions.jpg * Girls who suffer traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) may be more susceptible to behavioral problems like psychological distress and smoking compared to boys, according to a new study. * Each year, TBIs cause 2.5 million emergency room visits, and so far research has consistently shown that they're more common among boys than girls. Girls still get them, though, and often in sports like soccer, basketball and cheerleading. A new study published in the journal PLOS ONE that surveyed 9,288 Ontario students in grades 7 through 12 reports that girls who suffered brain injuries—in sports, most commonly—were more likely to report having contemplated suicide, experienced psychological distress, been the target of bullying and having smoked cigarettes. * Overall, the new study reports that one in five adolescents had sustained a TBI that resulted in their loss of consciousness for at least five minutes or hospitalization at some point in their lifetime. Boys experienced them 6% more than girls. These young people who had experienced a lifetime TBI also reported behaviors in the last year like daily smoking, binge drinking, using marijuana, cyberbullying and poor grades. * Girls get TBIs most often playing soccer and basketball, but other sports—cheerleading, in particular—have very high risk for injuries. The American Academy of Pediatrics has called for more safety regulations for the cheerleading, even though it tends to not be included in national high school sports injury research. (Time.com) Continue reading
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11
Aug

2017 NFL Season About To Start. Hope For A New Football Helmet To Prevent TBI.

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_vicis-zero1-helmet.jpg * Football is a game of inches, and none is more important than the inch and a half between the outside shell of a helmet and a player’s skull. Since the 1940s, when hard plastic helmets began to replace leather ones, the primary purpose of the helmet has been to guard against skull fractures and hematomas (bleeding on the brain)—catastrophic injuries that led to deaths on the football field in the early 1900s. In recent years, however, scientific studies have led to a better understanding of the short- and long-term consequences of blows to the head. * In 2015, the number of diagnosed concussions, in both preseason and regular-season practices and games, totaled 271. And the number diagnosed in regular-season games (182) was up 58 percent from 2014—and 18% over the four-year average. They all realized the issue of head trauma was not going away, and they wondered: What more could be done with helmets? * Though the medical community understands the nature of concussions better than ever, the injury remains something of a riddle for doctors and scientists, because it presents in different ways for different people. One long-held theory was that the brain sloshes back and forth during a collision, striking the rough inner surface of the skull and rebounding against the opposite side—a violent act that causes bruising and swelling. * VICIS’ design literally turns the traditional hard polycarbonate helmet that’s been used for decades inside out. A stiff plastic shell inside still protects against skull fractures, but it’s the first helmet to have an outside surface made of a flexible polymer that deforms locally upon impact, rather than making that familiar crack sound. The concept is the same as that of a bumper on a car: The material bends, thereby slowing down the impact and reducing the force transferred to the person inside, according to Newton’s Second Law of Motion (force=mass x acceleration). The outer and inner layers are connected by a matrix of columns that flex in all directions to absorb linear, and most importantly, rotational forces. (SI.com) Continue reading
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12
Jun

Brain Facts

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_plugged-in-brain.jpg 1. The human brain, weighs only about 3lbs. (around 1.5 kg.), makes up just 2% of the body weight and uses around 20% of the body’s oxygen and blood. 75% of the total brain mass is water. 2. It is the fattest organ in the body, contains 100 billion neurons or nerve cells (15 times the total human population on earth) and a trillion glial cells and has around 150,000 miles of blood vessels. 3. The brain processes information as slow as 0.5m/sec to as fast as 120m/sec. The brain can survive without oxygen for 4-6 minutes after which it begins to die. Lack of oxygen for 5-10 minutes can lead to permanent brain damage. 4. Physical exercise is just as important for the brain as it is for the rest of the body. In a recent study published in the annals of internal medicine suggest that exercise can delay the age at which people may get Alzheimer’s disease by more than 30% as it improves and makes more regular the blood flow to the brain. 5. Music triggers activity in the same part of the brain that releases the ‘pleasure chemical’ dopamine during sex and eating. 6. Everyone dreams, even blind people, for at least 1-2 hours and on an average 4-7 dreams each night. Brain waves are more active while you are dreaming than when you are awake. 7. It is a myth that we use only 10% of the brain, in fact every part of the brain has a known function. Also, there is no left/right brain divide-they work together. And No, brain cells do not die whenever you sneeze. (ExaminedExistence.com) Continue reading
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12
Jun

Who Has A Faster TBI Recovery - Men or Women?

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_symbols.jpg ***Female TBI patients recover better than males*** * The purpose of the present study was to look at possible gender differences in outcome after severe traumatic brain injury. Three hundred and thirty four consecutive patients, 72 females and 262 males, age range 5-65 years, were included in the study. Age range and severity of injury, evaluated by duration of unconsciousness, did not differ between male and female patients. Predicted outcome at the time of discharge from an in patient rehabilitation programme was evaluated according to work capacity. Female TBI patients had a better predicted outcome (p < 0.015). It is suggested that pro gesterone, acting as a neuroprotective agent, may explain this difference in outcome. * Why do some females recover from brain injury much faster and more completely than males?1 With more than 3 million people chronically disabled from traumatic brain injury, the answer may have far-reaching implications for the treatment of traumatic brain injury, stroke, and other neurological disorders. * For the past twenty-five years, neuroscientist Donald G. Stein, PhD and his colleagues have been investigating this question and have discovered something remarkable—that the hormone progesterone confers profound neuroprotective effects that improve outcomes and reduce mortality following brain injuries. * Progesterone provides powerful neuroprotection to the fetus, particularly in late pregnancy, when it helps suppress neuronal excitation that can damage delicate new brain tissue. Dr. Stein and his colleagues at Emory University in Atlanta have continued to develop, test, and prove the theory that in addition to protecting the fetal brain, progesterone also protects and heals injured brain tissue. (NCBI & Lifeextension.com) Continue reading
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09
May

TBI Recovery. Treatment For Concussions

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_ConcussionRRR.jpg **The most common and least serious type of traumatic brain injury is called a concussion. The word comes from the Latin concutere, which means "to shake violently." **As seen in countless Saturday morning cartoons, a concussion is most often caused by a sudden direct blow or bump to the head. The brain is made of soft tissue. It's cushioned by spinal fluid and encased in the protective shell of the skull. When you sustain a concussion, the impact can jolt your brain. Sometimes, it literally causes it to move around in your head. Traumatic brain injuries can cause bruising, damage to the blood vessels, and injury to the nerves. **If a child has a concussion, an adult should monitor him or her for the first 24 hours. It's important to watch for behavioral changes. Young children, especially, may not be able to fully communicate what they are feeling, so it is critical to watch them closely. Do not give medications, including aspirin, which may cause bleeding, to a child without consulting a doctor. **Concussions are graded as mild (grade 1), moderate (grade 2), or severe (grade 3), depending on such factors as loss of consciousness, amnesia, and loss of equilibrium. **Seek medical attention. A health care professional can decide how serious the concussion is and whether you require treatment. If you have suffered a grade 1 or grade 2 concussion, wait until symptoms are gone before returning to normal activities. That could take several minutes, hours, days, or even a week. **If you have sustained a grade 3 concussion, see a doctor immediately for observation and treatment. (WebMD.com) Continue reading
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09
May

Wars May Be Ending, However, TBI Recovery Is Still Needed

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_military-tbi.jpg **Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant health issue which affects service members and veterans during times of both peace and war. The high rate of TBI and blast-related concussion events resulting from current combat operations directly impacts the health and safety of individual service members and subsequently the level of unit readiness and troop retention. The impacts of TBI are felt within each branch of the service and throughout both the Department of Defense (DoD) and the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health care systems. **Veterans may sustain TBIs throughout their lifespan, with the largest increase as the veterans enter into their 70s and 80s; these injuries are often caused by falls and result in high levels of disability. **Active duty and reserve service members are at increased risk for sustaining a TBI compared to their civilian peers. This is a result of several factors, including the specific demographics of the military; in general, young men between the ages of 18 to 24 are at greatest risk for TBI. Many operational and training activities, which are routine in the military, are physically demanding and even potentially dangerous. (DVBIC.com) Continue reading
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08
Apr

Common TBI Symptoms

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_traumetic-brain-injury.jpg * TBI symptoms vary depending on the extent of the injury and the area of the brain affected. Some symptoms appear immediately; others may appear several days or even weeks later. A person with TBI may or may not lose consciousness—loss of consciousness is not always a sign of severe TBI. * A person with a mild TBI may experience: Headache. Confusion. Lightheadedness. Dizziness. Blurred vision. * A person with moderate or severe TBI may have some of the symptoms listed above. In addition, the person may experience any of the following: Headache that gets worse or won’t go away. Repeated vomiting or nausea. Slurred speech. Convulsions or seizures. An inability to wake up from sleep. (Nih.gov) Continue reading
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26
Jan

Diabetes Can Affect Your Brain

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_Brain-Damage.png Diabetes can have an impact on your whole body. Your brain is no exception. Recent studies have linked type 2 diabetes to a slowdown in mental functioning and an increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease. The chance of brain complications is just one more reason to keep your diabetes under control. “High blood sugar may directly affect either nerve cells or support cells in the nervous system,” says Alan Jacobson, M.D., emeritus professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. “It can also lead to damage in both large and small blood vessels.” This, in turn, reduces the amount of oxygen reaching the brain. Plus, it increases the risk of having a stroke, which can kill brain cells. Research has linked type 2 diabetes to a decline in mental functioning. One study looked at which mental abilities were hardest hit in middle-aged and older adults with diabetes. The results pointed to neurocognitive speed and executive functioning. “These are thought to be major components of cognitive health,” says researcher Roger Dixon, Ph.D., a psychology professor at the University of Alberta. (HealthGrades.com) Continue reading
Hits: 1303
26
Jan

As the Super Bowl Approaches, Inspiring Football Stories Abound

Posted by on in TBI
b2ap3_thumbnail_felicia-perez.jpg Every family involved in sports know the joys and danger of playing football. (TBI is ever present.) However, Felicia Perez has a different attitude. Felicia Perez didn’t suffer any injuries while playing football for Brandywine High School last season. Unless you consider broken fingers to be injuries, which she does not. That fearless attitude and a ceaseless work ethic have made this 4-foot-8 battering ram willing to smash her nose into any situation a hit with the Bulldogs. “Felicia is tough as nails,” Brandywine head coach Isaiah Mays said last week. “The best way to describe it is she would much rather be the hammer than the nail. She definitely works hard every day, and she has no quit in her.” Delaware has seen several girls play high school football over the last few years, but most have been kickers or safeties. Perez is a middle linebacker and fullback, which puts her in the pileup every time she's on the field. She wouldn’t want to be anywhere else. “I like to be the dominant person,” Perez said. “Other females follow other females. I’m not a follower. I’m a leader. So I decided I was going to play a predominantly male sport.” (USAtoday.com) Continue reading
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